Rex LeRoy Kent

1889 – 1964

 

Businessman – Gambler – Race Car Driver – Trap Shooter

He Excelled at Them All!

 

 

Rex Kent was born on August 19, 1889 in the unincorporated community of Edson, nine miles east of Goodland in Sherman County, Kansas.  He was the oldest of three children born to Rufus Absalom Kent (1860-1939) and his wife, Mary D. “Mollie” (Maris) Kent (1860-1941).  Kent attended the Wentworth Military Academy at Lexington, Missouri in 1906 and 1907.  He was married in 1912 at Denver, Colorado to Clara May “Plum” Thorsen (1888-1963) and they had a son, Robert Arthur “Bob” Kent (1915-1980).  Kent was also the father of Constance Clara (Kent) Taylor (1927-2012).

In 1910, Rex Kent was residing with his parents at Goodland, Kansas and working with his father as a clerk in a local bank.

Kent was shooting craps in a local establishment one night when another player in the game was wiped out saying that he had lost every dime that he had; everything.  Later that night, Kent approached the man and told him that he should not play the game if he could not afford to lose.  Kent then returned all of the man’s money to him and even a little extra.

In October of 1914, Kent and a partner, Fred Strohwig (1884-1960) of Norton, Kansas promoted motorcycle races at the Sherman County Fairgrounds in Goodland.  The event was so successful that the dual organized and then promoted a series of flat track motorcycle races beginning at the fairgrounds at Goodland, Kansas on May 24-25, 1915; then moving to the fairgrounds at Norton, Kansas; Smith Centre, Kansas; and ending up with a 100-mile feature race at the Kansas Free Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas on May 31, 1915; that last event paying a purse of $400.  Again, they promoted another big motorcycle race at Norton on September 23-24, 1915 that they billed as the “state championship”.  Entries came from over a large section of the Midwest and these races too, were a big success.

In January of 1915, Kent had moved his family to Norton, Kansas where he and a partner, Earl C. Craige (1886-1963), opened the new Kent Garage.  The garage served as a new car agency for Studebaker automobiles with a territory that covered 14 counties in northwestern, Kansas.  By May of that year, he had expanded his new car offering there to also include a Dodge agency.  He also became an active member of the Norton Gun Club.

On July 6, 1915, the police in Norton, Kansas got a call that some men had torn down some new gates and about ½ mile of new fencing about ten miles east of Norton.  Bloodhounds were quickly brought in by train from Phillipsburg, Kansas.  Kent met the train and sped both the dogs and the officers to the crime scene but the perpetrators had already made their getaway.

At the request of the Studebaker corporation, Kent organized a four-day endurance run that covered 1,000 miles of his dealership’s territory.  The event began November, 1 1915 with Rex Kent driving a new Studebaker “Six” the first day of the run; his father drove the car the second day; and then Rex drove the final two days.  The evening of the final day, Kent and some of his employees were celebrating at a garage that Kent owned at Smith Centre, Kansas when a pistol that one of Kent’s employees was holding, went off striking Kent in the calf of one of his legs.  After the wound had been treated by a local doctor, Kent was sent home to Norton that same night.

By 1916, Kent had moved his family to Concordia, Kansas where he and his father, opened a Studebaker automobile agency.  If one was going to sell new automobiles at that time, they needed to be entering some of those automobiles in local automobile races that were becoming quite popular at various fairgrounds across the Midwest.  The following are the automobile races that Rex Kent is known to have participated in although we know that it is an incomplete listing of all of the races that he competed in:

 

 

Daily Telegram - Norton, Kansas

Saturday, October 20, 1917, page 3

 

August 29, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

          Attendance:  10,000

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  3rd in the 1st heat race behind ______ Jackson of Concordia, Kansas in a Studebaker “Six” and A. J. Cleveland of Salina, Kansas in a Hudson “Super-Six”.

  3rd in the 3rd heat race behind A. J. Cleveland of Salina, Kansas in a Hudson “Super-Six” and ______ Jackson of Concordia, Kansas in a Studebaker “Six”.

             2nd behind Glenn Breed in both 5-mile races that made up the “Free-for-All”

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas in his Hudson “Super-Six” #1

 

In 1917, Rex Kent and his father opened a tire repair business in Beloit, Kansas and then sold their Studebaker agency and garage in Concordia, Kansas to the Studebaker Corporation of America which made it a subsidiary of the Kansas City, Missouri branch of the company.  The Kents retained their Kent Tire Repair Shop in Beloit, Kansas and opened a large, new Studebaker dealership at Goodland, Kansas to service the Northwest district of Kansas for the company.

 

 August 22, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  2nd in the 1st 5-mile heat race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in a Ford.

  3rd in the 2nd 5-mile heat race behind Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas in a Hudson “Super-Six” #1 and Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-Valve Roof Ford.

Feature race winner:  The final 5-mile race was 1st stopped and then canceled after a last-lap crash involving Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas in a Hudson “Super-Six” #1 and Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-Valve Roof Ford.

 

 

 August 28, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

           Attendance:  12,000

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  Won the 1st 5-mile heat race in 6:41.0 over Johnny Mais of Salina, Kansas in his Mais special.

               Won the 2nd 5-mile heat race in 6:04.0 over Johnny Mais of Salina, Kansas in his Mais special.

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in a Studebaker “Six”

 

September 4, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds at Belleville, Kansas

Attendance:  12,000

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  Won the 1st heat of the “Free-for-All” race.

              Won the 2nd heat race of the “Free-for-All” race over Lloyd Sissell of Scandia, Kansas in an Overland.

             Was declared the overall winner of the “Free-for-All” race over Robert Cusick of Clyde, Kansas in an Overland.

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in a Studebaker “Six”

 

September 7, 1917 – 1-mile dirt oval – Oakdale Park at Salina, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  2nd in the 1st 5-mile heat race of the “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-Valve Roof Ford.

              2nd in the 2nd 5-mile heat race of the “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-Valve Roof Ford.

  3rd in the 3rd 5-mile heat race of the “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller in his 16-valve Roof Ford and ______ Marshall in an Overland.  Kent lost a wheel coming out of a turn, during this race.  He was able to get the wheel replaced and return to the race without causing any damage.  [Note:  One published source states that Kent finished in 2nd place instead of in 3rd place behind Harold Roller in this race.]

 

Rex Kent in his Studebaker “Six” racing car.  This car was destroyed in an accident during a race at Belleville, Kansas on August 23, 1918.

Belleville Telescope and Freeman newspaper.

 

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

 

October 2, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

Car:  Buick

Finish:  Won the stock car race.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

 

October 5, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Clay County Fairgrounds at Clay Centre, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  3rd in the “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford and Johnny Mais of Amarillo, Texas in his Mercer special #24.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

 

October 9, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Marshall County Fairgrounds at Blue Rapids, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  Won the “Free-for-All” race over Victor “Vic” Duff of Concordia, Kansas in his Velie.  “One curve in the racetrack had no banking and was very dusty, so the cars could not take it very fast and every car in the race went off of that turn and through the fence at one point or another.  During the race, winner Kent’s car ran through the fence but he was not injured and his car was but very slightly damaged.”

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in a Studebaker “Six”.

 

On October 20, 1917, Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas in his Hudson “Super-Six” #1 and Harold Roller of Lincoln, in his 16-valve Roof Ford ran a best two-out-of-three series of 5-mile match races at the Lincoln County Fairgrounds at Lincoln, Kansas.  The two contestants selected Rex Kent to be the official starter as well as one of the judges for those races.  Breed won the first two races to be declared the overall victor.

 

October 25, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Elmwood Park at Norton, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  These races were postponed until October 26, 1917 due to unclimactic weather.

 

October 26, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Elmwood Park at Norton, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  Results of these races have let to be located.

 

October 27, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Smith Centre Fairgrounds at Smith Centre, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own Studebaker “Six”

Finish:  No results of the races have been located to date.

 

Over the winter of 1917, Kent designed a new race car for the upcoming racing season.  He then persuaded Ray Cole, a mechanic and the proprietor of Cole’s Garage in Smith Centre, Kansas, to build it for him.  Cole started with a Ford body and frame that had been lightened and shortened 16 inches.  He then installed a newly reworked Studebaker “Six” engine in the car.

 

This ad appeared on page 8 of the July 19, 1918 issue of the ”Belleville Telescope and Freeman” newspaper.  The picture was probably staged and taken at the Republic County Fairground.  The driver of car #3 is Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas who both promoted these races and competed in them in a Studebaker “Six”.  The driver of #24 is Johnny Mais in his Mais special.

 

 

June 5, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Smith Centre Fairgrounds at Smith Centre, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  No results of the races have been located to date.

 

June 6, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Smith Centre Fairgrounds at Smith Centre, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Won 4 races and finished 2nd in the 2nd race.  No names of any of the other competitors were given in the newspaper account of these races.

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in his own shortened Ford chassis equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

 

June 7, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Elmwood Park at Norton, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  These races were canceled due to rain.

 

July 4, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Smith Centre Fairgrounds at Smith Centre, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Few results of the races have been located to date.

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in his own shortened Ford chassis equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

 

July 10, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Smith Centre Fairgrounds at Smith Centre, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Attendance: “a very large crowd.”

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Kent won several of these races himself.  Lafe Cole of Cedar, Kansas drove a 16-valve Ford special to a 2nd place finish behind Kent in the “Free-for-All” race.

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in his own shortened Ford chassis equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

 

July 12, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds at Franklin, Nebraska

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

July 20, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds at Belleville, Kansas

These races were organized and promoted by Rex Kent

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  The following story did run on the front page of the next issue of the local newspaper: “The automobile racing program put on by Rex Kent of Concordia, drew a big crowd, but the races were not up to the standard of races Mr. Kent has been giving the people at points west of Belleville.  For some reason, some of the races did not fill and Mr. Kent did the best he could, under the circumstances, to fill some of the races and give the people an exhibition for their money.  Several of the racing cars went out of commission in the first race which handicapped contests that followed.”

              Kent finished 3rd in the feature race behind 2nd place Lafe Cole of Cedar, Kansas in a 16-valve Ford special.

Feature race winner:  None of the race winners in these races have been located to date.

 

July 25, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Tied for 1st place in time trials with Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas driving a Hudson “Super-Six” #1.  Their time for 1-mile was 1:15.6

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

 

August 1, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Nuckolls County Fairgrounds at Nelson, Nebraska

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Leading the 14-car, 10-mile “Free-for-All” when the differential broke on his Studebaker “Six” just 300-yards short of the finish.  Newspaper accounts of the event do not name the eventual winner of the event.

 

August, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mitchell Fairgrounds at Mitchell, Nebraska

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Kent was leading the field in the 25-mile feature race when a bracket on his gas tank broke causing the car to flip end-for-end.

 

August, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Clay County Fairgrounds at Clay Center, Nebraska

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Kent was the organizer and promoter of these races but nothing more has been learned about them.

 

Kent was driving his Studebaker “Six” powered Ford race car on a highway near Clay Center, Nebraska on August 15, 1918 when a speeding motorcycle crossed through an intersection in front of him.  He swerved in an attempt to miss the motorcycle but drove into a ditch and the car overturned throwing both of its occupants from the vehicle.  Kent received a sprained arm in the accident but his passenger, Ivan Carver from Iowa, only lived for a few hours.  The motorcycle rider received a badly injured ankle.

 

August 17, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Minneapolis Fairgrounds at Minneapolis, Kansas

Car:  Studebaker special

Finish:  2nd in the 1st 3-mile heat race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas who was driving his 16-valve Roof Ford.

                  2nd in the 1st 5-mile heat race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas who was driving his 16-valve Roof Ford.

   1st in the 2nd 5-mile heat race in 6:50.0

   The overall victory was awarded to Harold Roller who won 2 of the 3 heat races.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

 

August 23, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds at Belleville, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own shortened Ford chassis rebuilt and lightened by Ray Cole of Smith Centre, Kansas in the spring of 1918 and equipped with a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  2nd in the 1st 5-mile heat race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas who was driving his 16-valve Roof Ford.

                  2nd in the 2nd 5-mile heat race behind Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas who was driving his 16-valve Roof Ford.

  Kent’s Studebaker “Six” powered Ford went out of control on a turn during the 3rd 5-mile heat race and crashed through a fence on the infield while turning completely over three times.  He was thrown from the car and was unconscious for a couple of hours.  His injuries were considered minor though as he only received some bruises and a shoulder injury.  Five spectators, who were sitting on the banking on the inside edge of the racetrack, were injured in the accident including one who lost his teeth and two others who suffered broken limbs.  Lawrence Levendofsky (1860-1918), a local farmer, was also killed in the accident.  The remainder of the races were canceled and Harold Roller, having won each of the preliminary races run so far that day, was declared to be the overall winner.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

      

[Note:  Although Kent was entered in the next two races in 1918 that are listed below, it is possible that he did not actually competed in either of them since he was recovering from the injuries he had received, both physically and emotionally, in the two fatal accidents that he had already been involved in, in August of 1918.  In all, that month, he had been involved in three accidents that month (one on a public road and two on racetracks) where his Studebaker “Six” powered Ford race car had overturned and he may have been rethinking his involvement in the sport.  More research is needed on that subject.]

 

 

Rex Kent’s Studebaker “Six” racing car after it was destroyed in a crash on the infield at the Republic County Fairgrounds at Belleville, Kansas on August 23, 1918.

High Banks Hall of Fame collection

 

August 28, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Brown County Fairgrounds at Hiawatha, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own race car powered by a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 4, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Rooks County Fairgrounds at Stockton, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own race car powered by a stock Studebaker engine

Finish:  3rd in the feature race behind John Gerry (or Gary) and W. B. Beam of Stockton, both of whom were driving Fords       

Feature race winner:  John Gerry (or Gary) in a Ford

 

September 5, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Rooks County Fairgrounds at Stockton, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own race car powered by a stock Studebaker engine

Finish:  2nd in the 1st heat race John Gerry (or Gary) in a Ford

              Won the “free-for-all” race over Harley Bronson of Stockton

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in his own race car with a stock Studebaker engine

 

September 6, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Rooks County Fairgrounds at Stockton, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own race car powered by a stock Studebaker engine

Finish:  Won the “free-for-all” race over Lloyd Power of North Platte, Nebraska in an Oakland

Feature race winner:  Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas in his own race car with a stock Studebaker engine

 

Kent was entered in races at Oakland Park at Salina, Kansas that were also run on the afternoon of September 6, 1918, but he did not compete in those.

Kent came down with a bad case of influenza in the fall of 1918 so he went home to rest and did not race anymore that year as the flu had been particularly vicious that year.

On February 15, 1919, the Concordia, Kansas police raided an elaborately fitted poker room in downtown Concordia.  The bomb proof room, supposedly police proof as well, had been modified to block sound and light from being noticed on the outside and one had to pass through three locked doors to gain admittance to the elaborately furnished room.  Seven players were arrested; one of which was Rex Kent.  Five days later, Kent plead guilty to the charges in police court and was fined $25 for illegal gambling plus another $60 for maintaining a room for that purpose.  He also had the pay court costs in addition to the fines.

In March of 1919, Kent moved to Norton, Kansas where he purchased a Buick garage, adding that to his other business holdings in Denver, Colorado and Concordia, Beloit, Russell, Norton and Goodland, all in Kansas.  Within a year, Kent had also acquired a hotel in Norton and had become an active member of the Isis Shrine there.

 

August 27, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

Car:  Kent’s own race car powered by a Studebaker “Six” engine

Finish:  3rd in the “Free-for-All” race behind Johnny Mais of Salina, Kansas in an Essex and Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford.

Feature race winner:  Johnny Mais of Salina, Kansas in an Essex

 

By 1919, Kent had was performing “automobile livery” services from the Cope Garage which was a new dealership for Buick automobiles that he had opened in Norton, Kansas.

By 1930, Kent had moved his family to Salina, Kansas where he and a partner, Ralph E. Sarvis (1891-1966), opened and operated the Kent Oil Company.  Rex was also the president of the Farmers Finance Company, the Jayhawk Oil Company, the Superior Refining Company, Rogers Construction Company and owner of the Kent Coffee Shop, all of Salina.

Rex and “Plum” Kent were divorced in the late 1930s and he moved to Denver, Colorado where he married Edith H. Lantz (1899-1954) from New Philadelphia, Ohio.  After Edith passed away in Denver, Rex moved back to Salina, Kansas where he was elected president of the Kansas Oil Men’s Association.

In 1955, Rex purchased the Milestone Motel and the Towne House Cafe, both in Russell, Kansas, to go with his Adams Motel in Denver, Colorado and the Kent Motel in Norton, Kansas.  By then, his Salina company also owned a chain of restaurants and service stations in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.

In 1957, Kent sold his Kent Oil Company, including 40 service stations, to The Vickers Petroleum Company in Wichita, Kansas.   He then turned what was left of his once thriving business empire over to his son, Robert.  The son did not have the business acumen of his father and each of the properties he acquired from the elder Kent eventually failed.

Rex married Harriet Marie, whose maiden name is unknown, and they moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 1959.

On November 15, 1963, Rex and Harriet Kent, along with their 36-year-old captain of their boat, Henry Kugel, had just left the Isle of Palms near Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on their 46-foot Chris-Craft cabin cruiser named the “Jayhawk”.  Kent had been having trouble with a fuel gage on the boat and was adjusting that when he apparently made a wrong adjustment causing a huge explosion.  The boat sank quickly and all three aboard were forced to swim to shore.  They were all taken to the Broward General Hospital where they were treated for their injuries.  Rex’s injuries were primarily to his legs and were quite serious.

Late in May of 1964, Rex and Harriet traveled to Morehead, North Carolina where they picked up a new cabin cruiser they named “Jayhawk Junior” and spent the rest of the summer months leisurely cruising it back to Fort Lauderdale.

Kent passed away in Broward General Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on October 13, 1964 due to the difficulty he was having breathing.  His body was cremated and his widow scattered his ashes over the water at Fort Lauderdale.

Rex Kent was a complicated man with great charm and a passion for living.  He was a stylish dresser with good looks and charm that attracted women.  He loved to gamble and took great risks in his life.  He was faithful to his friends and was willing to attack those he opposed.  His friendship to those he supported was absolute.  He loved his children, although he was disappointed with son Robert’s work ethic and he had very little contact with his grandchildren.

If you know anything more about Rex LeRoy Kent, please contact Bob Lawrence at: sprintguy @ cox.net

 

Autograph signed in 1917

 

 

 

Autograph signed in 1942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you:

Bruce Kent and Bob Mays