His name was originally:

Johann Anton Mais

 

But he anglicized it when he immigrated to America to:

John Anthony Mais

 

However thousands of racing fans knew him simply as:

Johnnie Mais

1888 – 1961

 

Johnnie and Elfrieda Mais

Bob Lawrence collection

Johnnie Mais was born on June 11, 1888 on the banks of the Rhine River at Coblence (now “Koblenz”) in the Prussian state of Germany and his 1st regular employment was in the Mercedes automobile factory in Germany.  He emigrated from Bremen, in northwest Germany, to America aboard the “S. S. Kaiser Whilhelm Der Grosse” arriving in New York City on January 26, 1909.  From there, he traveled directly to Indianapolis, Indiana as it was then the center of the American automobile industry.  He found work with the Hudson Motor Car Company while he designed trucks and, with the help of some investors, formed the Mais Motor Truck Company in Rochester, Indiana late in 1909.  The early models were 1 ton and 1½ ton sizes with a choice of 119 in. and 132 in. wheelbases.  Customers were even given their choice of engines as they came in 24½ h.p. and 34½ h.p. sizes.  The 1911 models sold for $2,600 each regardless of size.  They were well built and reliable trucks but that did not translate into profit so the courts soon ordered the Mais Motor Truck Co. to place its assets into receivership to satisfy creditors.  Ultimately, Mais trucks were built in sizes ranging from ½ ton to 5 tons and sold for up to $3,750 but the company was dissolved in 1913.

 

Mais was married in Indianapolis on July 26, 1911 to Elfrieda Hellmann (1892-1934).  She had been born in Indianapolis, Indiana, a daughter of German immigrants Peter L. Hellmann (1856-1927) and Margaret (Hoffman) Hellmann (1864-1918).  After their marriage, Elfrieda taught Johnnie how to speak more than just the broken English he had been getting by with.  She started working as an airplane stunt woman and wing walker in 1910 but changed to driving racing cars in 1912.

 

In the spring of 1914, Johnnie Mais and a partner, Harry Bannister, became the dealers for Imp and Mercury brand cyclecars.  They formed and operated the John A. Mais & Company on North Capitol Avenue in Indianapolis where, in his spare time, Mais designed and built a new 108 inch wheelbase Indy car chassis to house his modified 299 cubic inch overhead valve Mercer engine.  The Maises were still residing in Indianapolis when Johnnie entered his Mercer in the 1915 Indianapolis “500”.  He was the 10th driver to get his car into the starting field, doing so on the final day.  He qualified at 81.97 m.p.h. but, he gradually got bumped backward to the 20th starting position by the time qualifying ended.  He started the race on the outside of the 5th row in that 20th position in the then 4-abreast, 24-car lineup.  There are two completely different accounts, both written soon after the race, telling about what happened next.  Both are presented below:

 

 

 

The Mais Motor Truck Co. provided this vehicle to serve as the official press car for the 1913 running of the Indianapolis “500”.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

According a story on the front page of both the May 31, 1915 issues of the “The Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel” and the “Fort Wayne Sentinel” newspapers, Mais’ Mercer was the 1st to stop in the pits after the race got underway, as he had a “weak” (low) tire on the 4th lap.  After the repair, he rejoined the race but lagged far behind the field until he quit after having run only 19 more laps.  That caused the judges to officially rule that he was disqualified.  Mais had qualified nearly 17 m.p.h. slower than the pole speed turned in by DePalma.  Since he had started the race near the back of the field and then had a problem early in the going that had undoubtedly cost him at least a lap (and probably more) in the pits as well as any chance of finishing in the money; it is not much of a stretch to believe that the businessman in Mais saw that it would be very expensive to soldier on for nothing so he decided to cut his losses and withdraw from the race when he did.

 

According to a 1915 issue of “Motor Age” magazine, “the Mais Special was troubled with a flooding carburetor and stopped for adjustment after covering only 3 laps.  Pulling up again for the same cause after the 25th lap, (Mais) overshot the pit.  Instead of backing to it as he should have done, (he) ran around the road behind the pits to return to his proper place.  This leaving the course automatically disqualified the car.”

 

Whatever the true story might be, Mais was credited with the 22nd finishing position in the race which only paid prize money to the 10 best finishers.  11 cars went the full distance and Ralph DePalma got the victory.

 

Johnnie and Elfrieda moved from Indianapolis to Salina, Kansas at the end of May, 1917.  They then moved on to Amarillo, Texas by the first of July, 1917.  The couple moved next to Dodge City, Kansas before moving on to Phoenix, Arizona sometime before 1920.  After Phoenix, they moved to San Antonio, Texas where Johnnie became the state-wide dealer for Winfield carburetors.  Johnnie Mais was also becoming known as a good race car builder and an expert on Dodge engines.  Never a family to stay in one place very long, it was not long before the Maises moved back to Salina, Kansas.  In all of those places, Johnnie worked as a mechanic or machinist when he was not racing his own Mercer special #24 and later, Dodge special #24 automobiles.

 

Elfrieda had performed aerial acts while hanging from a biplane before she turned her attention to racing automobiles but women were not normally allowed to complete against the men in auto races at that time so Elfrieda often made solo exhibition runs in the family race car during intermissions at races they attended.  The first races that she drove exhibition laps at were at Saginaw, Michigan on July 4, 1915.  Throughout her professional career in auto racing, Elfrieda appeared as “Miss Elfrieda Mais” although it was no secret that she and Johnnie were married “in private life” as she explained it to reporters.

 

The Maises were divorced c1923 and she returned to Indianapolis where she found work as a stenographer.  Elfrieda married her 2nd husband in 1924.  He was the newly widowed William Pond Chapin (1886-1979) from a conservative New England family.  That marriage lasted until May, 1926 when it ending in divorce.  Elfrieda then married Robert Emmett Wallace (1903-1965) as her 3rd husband on December 19, 1928 in Bartholomew County, Indiana.  They were divorced sometime after 1930 and Elfrieda was married to Ray LaPlante (another race car driver) from Newark, New Jersey as her 4th husband by 1932.  They made their home in Tampa, Florida where Ray found work at the Roller Spring & Brake Company owned by former race car driver, Harold Roller.  By then, Elfrieda had expanded her public performances to included stunt demonstrations such as crashing automobiles through specially constructed wooden walls that were often rigged with dynamite and set a blaze.  It was while performing on of those stunts that she was fatally injured at the Alabama State Fair in Birmingham on September 27, 1934.  She is buried in the Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana.

 

The following is an incomplete listing of the races that Johnnie Mais is known to have participated in:

 

This photo of Johnnie Mais behind the wheel of his new hand-built, modified O.H.V. Mercer powered Indy car was taken at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway before the race in May of 1915.  The man seated beside Mais in the 2-man chassis is John Jackes who was Mais’ riding mechanic.  None of the other men in the photo have been identified to date.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

 

  

May 31, 1915 – 2 ½ mile brick oval – Indianapolis Motor Speedway  in Indianapolis, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Mais’ entered his own new Mais special Mercer #24 that was built in Indianapolis.  Mais crashed this car into the outside retaining wall in the southwest turn during practice laps on May 24, 1915.  The car spun around nearly a half-dozen times before hitting the outside wall again and became airborne before landing still upright at the bottom of the racetrack.  Mais was not injured in the accident and the car was quickly repaired.

Qualifying:  Mais was the 10th driver to attempt a qualifying lap.  He qualified for the race in 1:49.4 at an average speed originally announced at 82 m.p.h. (adjusted years later to 81.97 m.p.h.) on Saturday afternoon, May 22, 1915, that being the third and final day of qualifying.

Finish:  83,000 spectators witnessed Mais and his riding mechanic, John Jackes, start the race in the 20th position but then to drop out of the 200-lap Indianapolis “500” after completing just 23 laps.  He was credited with finishing in 22nd position although he was officially disqualified for leaving the racetrack and he received no prize money.

Feature race winner:  Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California

  

June 9, 1915 – 1-mile dirt oval – Galesburg District Fairgrounds at Galesburg, Illinois – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais qualified last in the 11-car field for this 100-lap race and dropped out early being awarded 10th place in the finishing order behind winner Eddie O’Donnell in a Duesenberg, Tom Alley in a Duesenberg, Billy Chandler in a Duesenberg, Joe Cooper in a Sebring, W. W. Brown of Kansas City, Missouri in a DuChesnea; Andy Burt in a Stutz, Jack Doughty in a Crown, Tom Ball in a Buick and Jim Hill in a Falcar.

            Feature race winner:  Eddie O’Donnell in a Duesenberg

 

June 26, 1915 – 2-mile wood oval – Speedway Park in Maywood, Illinois – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Mais’ entered his own Mais special Mercer #15

Finish:  80,000 spectators watched a field of 25 cars race for 250 laps but Mais’ Mercer was one of 5 cars that judges ruled had run too slow in time trials and heat races to complete start the 500-mile event.  Two other cars were withdrawn without running a single lap.  The minimum average speed required to start the race was 85 m.p.h.

Feature race winner:  Dario “Dolly” Resta  from England in a Peugeot

  

July 5, 1915 – ½ mile dirt oval – Saginaw Fairgrounds at Saginaw, Michigan

Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located

 

August 28, 1915 – 1-mile dirt oval – Richland County Fairgrounds at Mansfield, Ohio

Car:  Mais’ entered his own Mais special Mercer #15

Finish:  A very small crowd saw Mais run a mile in 74.0 seconds which was the 2nd fastest lap behind quick timer Harry McNay who was driving a Cino special.

            Mais finished 2nd in a 3-car, 5-mile match race won by Harry McNay.

            Mais started last in the 3-car, 10-mile Australian Pursuit and all the cars held their positions for the entire race making the finish a 3-way tie for 1st place among Mais, Morris Britt driving a Stutz, and Norris Kraft who was driving the Purcell special.  The time for the race was 13 minutes, 9.4 seconds.

Feature race winner:  No feature race was run.

 

September 11, 1915 – ½ mile dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds in St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special #6

Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

Feature race winner:  Louis Disbrow of Indianapolis, Indiana

 

September 25, 1915 – ½ mile dirt oval – Butte Fairgrounds in Butte, Montana – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

October 14-15, 1915 – 1½ mile dirt circle – Speedway Park in Wichita, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special #15

Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in published results of these races.

            Feature race winner:  Lee Gunning of Los Angeles, California

 

            At their November 11, 1915 meeting in New York City, New York, the 3-member A.A.A. contest board “disqualified and suspended” John A. Mais, a registered driver, from all events sanctioned by the A.A.A. until January 1, 1917 “for failure to appear for start at Sioux City (Iowa) on July 3 last, and for subsequently participating in various unsanctioned meetings in various unsanctioned meetings in violation of the” association’s regulations.

 

May 17, 1916 – ½ mile dirt circle – Muskingum County Fairgrounds at Zanesville, Ohio – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special

Attendance:  “perhaps 400”

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 20-lap Australian Pursuit Handicap race behind Johnny Raimey and his Simplex and Cliff Woodbury who was driving a Duesenberg.

            Mais finished 4th in a 6-lap race behind Fred Horey of St. Paul, Minnesota, who was driving a Fiat; Hugh Judson “Juddy” Kilpatrick of New York, City, New York, who was driving a Briscoe, and Cliff Woodbury, who was driving a Duesenberg.

            Feature race winner:  Bill Endicott of Kansas City, Missouri who was driving a Maxwell

    

May 20, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Silver Lake Park in Akron, Ohio – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

May 28, 1916 – 1-mile dirt circle – Michigan State Fairgrounds at Detroit, Michigan – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special

Finish:  Mais finished 4th in the 5-mile race for division 3 cars behind winner Joe Cleary of Boston, Massachusetts in a Case; Irwin “Putty” Hoffman of Racine, Wisconsin in a Mercer and Dwight Kessler of New Castle, Indiana in a Bullet.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 10-mile Michigan Railway Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” behind winner George Clark in a Case; Eddie Hearne of Chicago, Illinois in a Briscoe and Irwin “Putty” Hoffman.

            Mais finished 5th in the 10-mile International Railway Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” behind winner Hugh Judson “Juddy” Kilpatrick; Bill Endicott of Kansas City, Missouri in the Sweeney Special; Johnnie Raimey in a Darracq and Joe Cleary.

            Feature race winner:  Hugh Judson “Juddy” Kilpatrick of New York City, New York in a Briscoe

Indianapolis Star

May 25, 1915 – Page 10

 

   

June 17, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Illinois State Fairgrounds at Springfield, Illinois – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

Feature race winner:  Louis LeCocq of Pella, Iowa

 

July 1, 1916 - ½ mile dirt oval – Mid-America Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

July 4, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  7,000 spectators saw Mais run the 5th fastest time in time trials behind quick timer George Clark in a Case, Eddie Hearne in a Briscoe, Fred Horey in a Fiat and Bill Endicott in a Maxwell when Mais turned in a time of 38.0 seconds.

            Mais won $100 for his 3rd place finish behind winner Bill Endicott in a Maxwell and Fred Horey in a Fiat in the 5-mile race for automobiles with 450 cu.in. engines or less.

            Mais won $250 for his 3rd place finish behind winner George Clark in a Case and Bill Endicott in a Maxwell in the 25-mile race.

            Feature race winner:  George Clark of Ft. Worth, Texas

The fifth row of cars lined up

for the start of the

1915 Indianapolis “500”.

Left to right:  #24 Johnnie Mais,

#23 Eddie Rickenbacker,

#22 Ralph Mulford, and

#21 Tom Orr.  Cars were

assigned one number for

qualifying and then another

number specifically for the

race.  Mais, however, decided

to use his assigned race number,

from his only start in the

Indianapolis “500”, on his

race cars for most of the

rest of his racing career.

Wheaton collection

 

 

July 8, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  2,500 spectators watched as Mais was 1 of 5 entries in the 30-lap “Free-for-All” but he did not place in any of the top 3 positions.

Feature race winner:  Bill Endicott of Kansas City, Missouri in a Maxwell

 

July 29, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Greater Grand Forks Fairgrounds at Grand Forks, North Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais was one of five starters in a 5-mile race but he did not finish in the top two finishing places

            Mais dropped out of a 3-mile race.

Feature race winner:  Eddie Hearne of Chicago, Illinois

 

August 15, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cerro Gordo County Fairgrounds in Mason City, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

August 19, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cerro Gordo County Fairgrounds in Mason City, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

August 26, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  17th in the in the feature race behind Fred Horey driving a Fiat, Bill Endicott driving the Sweeney special, George Clark driving a Case, Dave Koetzla driving a Case, Hugh Judson “Juddy” Kilpatrick driving a Briscoe Louis LeCocq driving a Briscoe, Al Striegel driving a Stafford, Cliff Woodbury driving a Duesenberg, Ivan “Putty” Hoffman driving a Comet, Howard “Zip” Kizer driving a Case, Dwight Kessler driving a Bullet, Johnny Raimey driving a Maxwell, Eddie Hearne driving a Briscoe, Harry Pullum driving a Mercer, Ben Giroux driving a Russian special and Art Klein driving a Klein special.

Feature race winner:  Fred Horey of St. Paul, Minnesota

 

September 1, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

            Feature race winner:  George Clark of Ft. Worth, Texas

 

September 4, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Nebraska State Fairgrounds in Lincoln, Nebraska – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais qualified 6th fastest in time trials with 39.5 seconds and behind quick timer Eddie Hearne, Louis LeCocq, Phil “Red” Shafer, Cliff Woodbury and George Clark.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 25-mile “Free-for-All” race behind Bill Endicott and Eddie Hearne.

Feature race winner:  Bill Endicott of Kansas City, Missouri in a Maxwell

 

September 6, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds in St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais entered the 1st 25-mile heat race but the results of all of these races have bet to be located.

 

September 9, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds in St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais entered the 2nd 50-mile heat race but the results of all of these races have bet to be located.

 

September 11, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – South Dakota State Fairgrounds in Huron, South Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  10,909

Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the published results of these races

Feature race winner:  The 25-lap feature race was won by Eddie Hearne.

 

September 17-18, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Sioux City Fairgrounds at Sioux City, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          The advertised purse for these races was $2,000 for each day.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

          Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

September 21-22, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Colorado State Fairgrounds at Pueblo, Colorado – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

          Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

September 23, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  9,500 spectators watched Mais finish last in the 1st 4-car, 6-lap heat race behind Eddie Hearne in a Briscoe; Cliff Woodbury in a Duesenberg and Sig Haugdahl in a Mercer

            .Mais finished last in the 6-car, 10-lap preliminary heat for the Interstate Fair Sweepstakes behind Phil “Red” Shafer in a Maxwell; Cliff Woodbury, Dave Koetzla in a Case 47; Eddie Hearne and Sig Haugdahl.

            Mais finished 2nd behind Cliff Woodbury in the 7-car, 50-lap Interstate Fair Sweepstakes.  Only Woodbury and Mais completed the full 50 laps.

            Feature race winner:  Cliff Woodbury

 

September 27, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

A New either 1910 or

1911 Model Mais Truck

The Commercial Vehicle

December, 1910

 

Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 30, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

Feature race winner:  Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois.

 

October 3, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Memphis, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais won the 25-mile feature race.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

October 29, 1916 – ½ mile dirt oval – Texas State Fairgrounds in Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais finished 4th in the 26-mile feature race.

Feature race winner:  George Clark of Ft. Worth, Texas

 

July 28, 1917 – 2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

            Mais was the promoter of these races.

Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 100-mile “Free-for-All” behind winner Glenn Breed in a Hudson Super 6 and John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma in a Mercer.

            Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas

 

August 22, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds in Abilene, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais was 2nd fastest in time trials behind Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas in his Hudson Super 6.  Mais’ time was 1 minute, 14.4 seconds for one mile.  The total purse for these races was $690.

                        Mais finished 3rd in the 1st 5-mile heat behind Harold Roller of Salina, Kansas in his 16-valve Roof Ford special and Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas.

                        Mais finished in 4th place in the 2nd 5-mile heat behind winner Glenn Breed, Harold Roller and Rex Kent.

            Feature race winner:  The final 5-mile race was 1st stopped and then canceled after a last-lap crash involving Breed and Roller.

 

October 2, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

October 5, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Clay County Fairgrounds in Clay Center, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 2nd in the “Free-for-All” behind Harold Roller in his 16-valve Roof Ford special.

            Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Salina, Kansas

 

October 8, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  10,000 spectators saw Mais run the 3rd fastest time in time trials behind quick timer Jerry Wonderlich in a Sunbeam and Joe Allen in a Marquette Buick when he turned in a time of 35.0 seconds.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 4-car, 5-mile, 2nd heat race behind winner Louis Disbrow of Indianapolis, Indiana in the Disbrow special and Jerry Wonderlich in a Sunbeam.

            Mais finished last in the 5-car, 5-mile handicap race behind winner Jake Strickler of Enid, Oklahoma in a Hudson Super 6; Joe Allen in a Marquette Buick; Jerry Wonderlich in a Sunbeam and Cliff Woodbury in a Duesenberg.

            Mais finished 5th in the 6-car, 25-lap International Wheat Show Sweepstakes race behind winner Jerry Wonderlich, Joe Allen, Cliff Woodbury and Jake Strickler.  Mais had made a pit stop on that 9th lap and stayed in his pits for 2 laps before rejoining the fray.  By the 16th lap, Mais had lost another lap and spent the remainder of the race running hopelessly behind the field with no chance of winning

            Feature race winner:  Jerry Wonderlich of San Francisco, California

 

October 10, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Attendance:  10,909

Finish:  Mais ran the 5th fastest time in time trials behind quick timer Jerry Wonderlich in a Sunbeam; Cliff Woodbury in a Duesenberg; Joe Allen in a Marquette Buick and Jake Strickler in a Hudson when he turned in a time of 36.0 seconds.

            Mais finished 2nd behind Jake Strickler in a Hudson in 3 minutes, 42.4 seconds in the 5-car, 6-lap, 1st heat race.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 4-car, 10-lap handicap race behind Jake Strickler and Joe Allen.

            Mais finished 4th in the 6-car, 25-lap feature race behind winner Cliff Woodbury, Jake Strckler and Jerry Wonderlich.

            Feature race winner:  Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois

 

October 12, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  9,000 spectators Mais ran the 3rd fastest time in time trials behind quick timer Jerry Wonderlich in a Sunbeam and Cliff Woodbury in a Duesenberg when he turned in a time of 34.8 seconds.

            Mais finished 3nd behind Joe Allen in a Marquette Buick and Jake Strickler in a Hudson in the 4-car, 6-lap, 1st heat race.

            Mais won the 4-car, 10-lap handicap race over Jake Strickler in 6 minutes, 2 seconds..

            Mais finished 5th in the 5-car, 20-lap Wichita Sweepstakes race behind winner Cliff Woodbury, Joe Allen, Jake Strckler and King Kelly in a Mercer.

            Feature race winner:  Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois

 

October 27, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mississippi State Fairgrounds at Jackson, Mississippi – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

November 5, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval Cotton Palace in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais won the 5-mile handicap race.

            Feature race winner:  Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois

  

November 8, 1917 – ½ mile dirt oval Cotton Palace in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais won the 3-mile race for cars with engines of 300 cu.in. or less.

            Feature race winner:  Louis Disbrow of Indianapolis, Indiana

 

January 1, 1918 – 1-mile dirt oval – Arizona State Fairgrounds at Phoenix, Arizona

          Car:  Miller special

            For some currently undetermined reason, Mais used the alias “Johnnie Hoffman” in these races.  That fact was acknowledged in newspaper reports then they went on to use his real name in the remainder of their story.

            Attendance:  3,000

Finish:  Mais had the fastest time in time trials over Jim Thomas in an Overland, with 53.6 seconds for 1-lap.

            Mais finished 4th in the 5-car Australian Pursuit won by Jim Thomas in an Overland.

            In the 50-mile final race, Mais “took a spill on the south turn which hurled him into the fence and drove a splinter of wood 10 inches long into his thigh.  There were no bones broken and Mais was rushed” to the hospital where doctors said he would recover from his injuries “inside of two weeks”.

            Feature race winner:  Jim Thomas in an Overland special

 

February 24, 1918 – 1-mile dirt oval – Arizona State Fairgrounds at Phoenix, Arizona

          Finish:  Mais won the 50-mile feature race.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

April 7, 1918 – 1-mile dirt oval – Kern County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

            Finish:  Mais had the 3rd fastest time in time trials of 54.0 seconds.

                        Mais finisted 3rd in the 1-mild dash.

                        Mais finished 3rd in a 10-mile heat race.

                        Mais finished 3rd in another 10-mile heat race.

                        Mais finished 2nd another 10-mile heat race.

Feature race winner:  Roscoe Sarles of New Albany, Indiana

 

June 26-27, 1918 – 1-mile dirt oval – Oakdale Park at Salina, Kansas

Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

            Finish:  2nd behind Ray Burr Lampkin in a Sun Ray Roamer #8 in first day time trials with a time of 1 minute, 17.0 seconds.

                        4th place in a 4-mile heat race behind John Boyd in a Hudson #1, Ray Burr Lampkin in a Sun Ray Roamer #8, Roy Davidson in a Dans L’Argent #4

4th place behind Ray Burr Lampkin in a Sun Ray Roamer #8, John Boyd in a Hudson #1 and E. Epperson in a Mercer #11 with a time of 1 minute, 20.4 seconds in second day time trials.

Either 3rd or 4th in the 4-car, 4-mile “Free-for-All” behind Ray Lampkin, John Boyd, and the published results are unclear but, maybe, Roy Davisson.

Feature race winner:  First day:  John Boyd of Tulsa, Oklahoma driving a Hudson “Super-Six” #1 owned by Glenn M.  Breed

             Second day:  Ray Burr Lampkin of Kansas City, Missouri in his own Sun Ray Roamer

 

July 4, 1918 – 1-mile dirt oval – Albuquerque Fairgrounds at Albuquerque, New Mexico

This ad appeared on page 8 of the

July 19, 1918 issue of the ”Belleville

Telescope and Freeman” newspaper.

The picture was probably staged and

taken at the Republic County

Fairgrounds and the driver of car #3

is probably Rex Kent of Concordia,

Kansas who both promoted these races

 and competed in them in a Studebaker.

The driver of #24 is Johnnie Mais in his

Mais special.

 

 

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais won the 1st 5-mile match race over Jimmy Allen of Albuquerque, New Mexico who was driving an Apperson.

Mais finished 2nd to Jimmy Allen in the 2nd 5-mile match race.  It is unclear why only 2 match races were run leaving no decision as to who won the championship.

 

July 20, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds in Belleville, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Although there was a shortage of entries, these races did take place but no results of these races have been located to date.

 

July 25, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds in Abilene, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais was 4th fastest in time trials behind Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas; Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas and Harold Roller of Lincoln, Kansas.

              All of the races were won by either Harold Roller in 16-valve Roof Ford #4 or Glenn Breed in a Hudson “Super-Six” #1.

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas

 

August 23, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds in Belleville, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd overall in these races behind Harold Roller in his 16-valve Ford special and Rex Kent in a Studebaker.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Lincoln, Kansas

 

September 2, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Moberly Fairgrounds at Moberly, Missouri

            Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 3, 1918 due to rain.          

 

September 3, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Moberly Fairgrounds at Moberly, Missouri

            Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 8, 1918 due to rain.          

 

September 8, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Moberly Fairgrounds at Moberly, Missouri

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais won the 100-mile feature race finishing 4 laps in front of 2nd place finisher Frank McDonald in an Overland.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

November 28, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Paris Fairgrounds at Paris, Texas

            Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24

                        These races were postponed until December 6-7, 1918 due to “bad weather”.

 

December 6, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Paris Fairgrounds at Paris, Texas

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

                        7 cars were entered in these races.

Finish:  Mais had the fastest time in time trials running 1 mile in 1 minute, 11.4 seconds          

            Mais won the 3-cornered match race over Albert “Dutch” Striegel of Kansas City, Missouri.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

December 7, 1918 – ½ mile dirt oval – Paris Fairgrounds at Paris, Texas

            Car:  Mais’ own Mais special Mercer #24

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

April 6, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24.

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

May 9 - 10, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Carter County Fairgrounds at Ardmore, Oklahoma

            These races were promoted by Ray L. Beede

          Car:  Mais entered his own Mais special Mercer #24.

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

               

May 20, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Old Fairgrounds at Durant, Oklahoma

          Car:  Mais entered his own Duesenberg in these races of which he was the promoter.  Elfrieda Mais was entered as the driver of his Mercer #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd in the 5-mile heat for light non-stock cars behind Leo Rice of Ardmore, Oklahoma in a Dodge who finished 6.0 seconds ahead of Mais.

            Mais finished 2nd, 6 seconds behind Ray Rice in a Chalmers who won the 2-car, 3-mile match race in 4 minutes, 10.0 seconds.  [Note:  One source states that this was Johnnie Mais in a Duesenberg while another states that it was Elfrieda Mais driving a Mercer.]

            Mais finished 3rd, in the 6-car, 5-mile “Free-for-All” race for non-stock cars behind Glenn Breed who won the race in his Hudson Super 6 in 6 minutes, 43.0 seconds.  Ray Rice finished in 2nd place in a Chalmers, 24.0 seconds behind Breed.  Since her husband was the race promoter, Elfrieda Mais was allowed to compete in this race but she crashed into the fence on the 1st lap and her Mercer was damaged to severely to continue.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 5-mile “Free-for-All” in 6 minutes, 44.0 seconds and behind winner Glenn Breed in a Hudson Super 6 in 6 minutes, 18.0 seconds.  Leo Rice finished 2nd in his Dodge, 3.0 seconds behind Breed.

            Mais’ Duesenberg suffered a broken steering knuckle forcing him to drop out of the 10-mile “Free-for-All” race for non-stock vehicles.  That race was won by Glenn Breed.

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas

 

May 23, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Carter County Fairgrounds  at Ardmore, Oklahoma

            These races were promoted by Ray L. Beede

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis).  He had recently paid $400 for the stock Essex that became this car after it had been through a fire in Ft. Texas.

Finish:  Mais “hit the car on a high place and burst the transmission” on the way to these races from the races in Durant, Oklahoma and could not get the car repaired in time to compete.

Feature race winner:  Leo Rice of Ardmore, Oklahoma driving a Dodge special

 

July 12 – 13, 1919 – 1-mile dirt oval – Fair Park Speedway  at Dallas, Texas

            Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

 

August 27, 1919 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais won the Free-for-All race over Harold Roller in his Ford.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

August 30 – 31, 1919 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack at Enid, Oklahoma

            These races were promoted by Jake Strickler

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

September 3, 1919 – 1-mile dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mias tied with George Clark for third place behind Harold Roller and Glenn Breed in time trials with a lap of 1 minute, 2.2 seconds.  Mais then placed third in the 25-mile Victory Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller and Canadian Harry Dempster.  Mias had been running in second place until he was passed by Dempster on the 21st lap of the Victory Sweepstakes “Free-for-All.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas

 

 

September 3, 1919 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais won the Free-for-All race over Harold Roller in his Ford.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

September 4, 1919 – 1-mile dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais finished 4th in the 25-lap Victory Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” race behind Harold Roller, George Clark and Harry Dempsey.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas

 

September 4, 1919 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd behind Charlie Blosser of Belleville, Kansas in the stock car race.

            Mais finished 2nd behind Harold Roller in the Free-for-All race.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas

 

September 11, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Carter County Fairgrounds at Ardmore, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais “blew up” and was unable to finish the 10-mile final race “in any kind of shape.”

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas

 

September, 1919 – ½ mile dirt ovalJackson County Fairgrounds at Medford, Oregon

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais turned in the fastest time in time trials with 1:09.0 for two laps which was a new track record.

            Mais won every race he was entered in bringing his personal total to 9 victories and 1 second place in the last 11 races he had competed in.  He had blown a tire in that one race and still finished in 2nd place.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

September 27, 1919 - ½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds  at North Platte, Nebraska

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais won the 2nd Lincoln County race in 5 minutes, 46.0 seconds.

            Feature race winner:  Noel Bullock of Madrid, Nebraska

 

October, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval - Maywood Fairgrounds at Maywood, Nebraska

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais won the 2nd 5-mile race.

            Mais finished 3rd in the feature race behind Noel Bullock and Glenn Breed.

            Feature race winner:  Noel Bullock of Madrid, Nebraska

   

October 14, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval - Barton County Fairgrounds at Great Bend, Kansas

            Mais and Glenn Breed co-promoted these races and both also competed in them but the results have yet to be located.  The advertised total purse was $1,000.

 

October 17, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Ellis County Fairgrounds at Ellis, Kansas

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

            Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

  

November 4, 1919 – ½ mile dirt oval – Pratt County Fairgrounds at Pratt, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  There were seven race cars on hand.  Mais finished second in every race run, following Glenn Breed across the finish line in each.  Arthur Hutchins in a 16-valve Ford finished in third place in each of those races.

 

April 23 - 24, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

            Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

April 24, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

May 15-16, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  There was a $2,000 purse posted for these races but they were canceled due to flooding in the area.

 

May 21, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Pittsburg County Fairgrounds at McAlester, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais won the 8-mile feature  race over Harold Roller in 10 minutes, 55.0 seconds.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Dallas, Texas

 

June 15, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Barton County Fairgrounds at Great Bend, Kansas

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 10-mile “Free-for-all” race behind the Fords of Harold Roller and Leonard Kerbs.

            Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in a 16-valve Roof Ford special

 

July 5, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  10,000 spectators saw Mais run 2nd fastest to quick timer Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas in a Ford in time trials having run 2 laps in 1 minute, 10.6 seconds in the field of 10 cars.

            Mais won the 5-car, 10-lap heat race for the fastest half of the cars from time trials.  His time for the 5-miles was 6 minutes, 9.6 seconds over Fred Lentz of Hutchinson, Kansas in a Hudson.

            Mais won the 5-car, 30-lap “Free-for-All” race in 19 minutes, 20.2 seconds over Elmer J. Negy of Hutchinson, Kansas in a Haynes.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of San Antonio, Texas

 

October 8, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

Hutchinson News

August 19, 1919 – Page 8

 

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in published results of these races.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in a 16-valve Roof Ford special

 

October 9, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais set the fastest time in time trials running 2-laps against the clock in 1 minute, 9.4 seconds.

            Mais pursued leader Harold Roller closely in the 30-lap Sweepstakes race until Mais dropped out of the race with a flat tire.

Feature race winner:  Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas in a 16-valve Roof Ford special

 

October 14, 1920 – 1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

          Attendance:  The promoter of these races was Elfrieda Mais who was assisted by the Saline County Motor Association.  The total paid admission was 1,384 spectators and the City of Salina charged Elfrieda $138.40 for the use of the facility.

            Purse:  The total posted purse was $2,000 of which half was paid to the first three finishers in the 50-mile “Free-for-All” race.

Car:  Mais’ own Essex hi-bred #24 (Essex engine is a specially built chassis)

Finish:  Mais ran 1-lap in time trials of 1:02.0 which was 3rd quickest behind Harold Roller who was driving 16-valve Roof Ford and Fritz “Fraty” Willard who was driving a Hudson.  Ten cars participated in time trials.  Elfrieda Mais then drove her husband’s #24 Essex on an exhibition lap of the track in time trials and turned in a lap of 59.0 seconds which was the second fastest lap run all day behind the 58.0 lap run in time trials by Harold Roller.

            Johnnie Mais drove one of ten cars entered in the 5-mile “Free-for-All” race for stock automobiles.  There were two Essexes in that race and one of them won the event and the $50 first place prize.  It is currently unknown which Essex driver won the race.  The other Essex driver in the race was Merle Warren.

            Eight cars started the 50-lap feature race which was won by Mais.  He collected $500 from the purse for the victory.  Harold Roller placed 2nd to win $300 from the purse and Johnny Lee of Wichita, Kansas placed 3rd which paid him $200.

 

Salina Daily Union

October 13, 1920 – Page 6

 

Elfrieda Mais, with the assistance of the Saline County Motor Association, promoted this racing program.  The day following the races, an article on the front page of this newspaper espoused how the City of Salina, Kansas had enjoyed working with such a professional promoter and they did not encounter a single problem with the way she ran her operation.

 

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

October 27, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Bell County Fairgrounds at Temple, Texas

          Attendance:  5,000

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd in the 1st 4-car, 5-mile first heat race behind Glenn Breed in a Hudson.

           Mais finished 2nd in the 4-car, 2nd 5-mile heat race behind Glenn Breed.

           Mais finished 2nd in the 4-car, 10-mile feature race behind Glenn Breed.

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed

 

October 28, 1920 – ½ mile dirt oval – Bell County Fairgrounds at Temple, Texas

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd in the 1st 5-mile heat race behind Glenn Breed in a Hudson.

           Due to a shortage of entries, Elfrieda Mais was allowed to enter the 2nd 5-mile final race.  Glenn Breed won that race too followed by Elfrieda Mais in 2nd place in an Essex and Johnnie Mais in 3rd place in his Dodge special.

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed

 

January 1, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Carolina Fairgrounds at Greensboro, North Carolina

            Car:   Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Total Purse:  Race promoter I. F. Calkins posted a purse of $2,000

Finish:  Mais won the 3-car, 10-lap heat in 7 minutes, 38,4 seconds in a close race over I. F. Calkins of Kinston, North Carolina in a 16-valve Ford.

            Mais won the 5-car, 20-lap “Free-for-All” in 12 minutes, 44.0 seconds.

Feature race winner:   Johnnie Mais

 

January 17, 1921 – 2/3 mile dirt oval – San Antonio Fairgrounds at San Antonio, Texas

            Car:   Mais’ own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais won the 20-mile race for light cars in 18 minutes, 15.0 seconds.  2nd place went to Bill Meaun in a Gillett who was 2 minutes, 5.4 seconds behind Mais.

            Mais won the 20-mile race for heavy cars in 19 minutes, 12.6 seconds.  Glenn Breed finished 2nd in his Hudson Super 6 just .10 of a second behind Mais.

            Mais finished 2nd behind Glenn Breed in the 20-mile “Free-for-All” race, 4 minutes, 21.0 seconds behind Breed.

Feature race winner:   Glenn Breed of Dallas, Texas

 

February 22. 1921 – 11/8 mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 2nd, 7.8 seconds behind Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in the 7-car, 5-lap “Free-for-All” race.

                        Mais finished 2nd; 7.2 seconds behind Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in the 7-car, 10-lap race.

                        Mais finished 2n to Glenn Breed in the 8-car, 15 lap Sweepstakes.

            Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Dallas, Texas

 

February 23. 1921 – 11/8 mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in the 10-lap “Free-for-All” race, Mais being 14.4 seconds behind Breed at the finish.

            Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in the 5-car, 5-lap final race.  This time, Mais was only .2 seconds behind Breed at the finish.

            Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Dallas, Texas

 

March 12. 1921 – 11/8 mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

March 13. 1921 – 11/8  mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in the 5-lap heat race.  Mais was 1 second behind Breed at the finish.

                        Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in a 2-car, 3-lap match race.  This time, Mais was 1 seconds behind Breed at the finish.

                        Mais won the 10-lap handicap race over Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6

                        Mais and Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6 tied for 1st place in the Australian Pursuit.

            Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed of Dallas, Texas

 

April 17, 1921 – 2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway in San Antonio, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 10-mile race behind winner Ira Vail in a Duesenberg and George Clark of Ft. Worth, Texas.

                        Mais finished 3rd in the 30-mile feature race behind winner George Clark of Ft. Worth, Texas and Ira Vail.

            Feature race winner:  George Clark in the Blocker special

 

April 20, 1921 – 2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway in San Antonio, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais suffered a blown engine in his heat race.

            Feature race winner:  Ira Vail in a Duesenberg

 

April 24, 1921 – 2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway in San Antonio, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais won the 10-mile handicap race over John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma who was driving the C. L. Richards special in 8 minutes, 5.4 seconds.

                        Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed driving a Hudson Super 6 in a 2-car, 3-lap match race.  This time, Mais was 1 seconds behind Breed at the finish.

                        Mais won the 10-lap handicap race over Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6.

                        Mais and Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6 tied for 1st place in the Australian Pursuit.

                        Mais dropped out of the 30-mile feature race that was won by Ira Vail in a Duesenberg.

                        6,000 spectators saw the drivers compete for $7,000 in prize money.

            Feature race winner:  Ira Vail in a Duesenberg

 

May 24, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  A total purse of $1,000 was posted for these races but results of them have yet to be located.

 

June 14, 1921 – 1-mile dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

          Attendance:  Johnnie Mais was the promoter of these races and he had 2,000 paying spectators.

Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  11 cars took time trials.  Mais ran the fastest time in time trials turning 1 lap in 55.15 seconds.

              Mias won the 10-mile “Free-for-All” in 10:45.0.

              Mais won the 10-mile race for cars which engines of 250 c.u. or less, in 10:15.0

             Mias won the 50-mile feature race in 51:13.25.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

July 4, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

          These races were promoted by Merle Warren

          Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the published results of these races.  He was also entered in a race run at the Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas but his name does not appear in the published results of those races either so it really is not known where, or if, he even competed on this date.

 

August 26, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval Brown County Fairgrounds at Hiawatha, Kansas

           Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais lowered the track record by two seconds in time trials.  The new track record for two laps is 1:10.2.

                         Mais won a 5-mile race.

                         Mais won a 10-mile race.

            Feature race winner:  Phenias C. “Dad” Harrier of Hiawatha, Kansas

 

August 31, 1921 – 2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

           Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

                        11 cars were entered in these races.  Mais’ share of the purse was $1,075.

            Finish:  Mais ran the fastest lap in time trials.

                        Mais won the 50-mile race over Johnnie Lee of Wichita, Kansas in a Dodge in 41 minutes, 41 seconds.

                        Mais won the 100-mile race over Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas in a Ford in 1 hour, 24 minutes, 53.0 seconds.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

September 5, 1921 – 1-mile dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

          Attendance:  The total paid attendance was 5,252 spectators in the grandstands.  The gross receipts were $6,436.86.

Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24 for Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas to drive in these races, while both Johnnie and Elfrieda Mais served as the race promoters.  Since oil was so expensive, the Maises ordered salt to be spread on the racetrack hoping that it would help reduce the dust.

Finish:  Roller finished second behind Leonard Kerbs in the first 10-mile “Free-for-All” race.

Roller won the 10-mile Australian Pursuit in 9:55.0.

Roller won the 6-car, 10-mile “Light car” race in 9:41.0.

On the third lap of the 50-mile “Free-for-All”, the steering broke on the front straightaway on the car being driven by Roy Lamb.  Roller’s Mais Dodge special bumped into Lamb’s car in the intense dust causing Roller’s car to catch fire and badly damaging it. 

One thing that John Gerber would tell about seeing at these races years later, is that Mais had just gotten a brand new Oldsmobile truck car hauler for his race car.

            Feature race winner:  William K. Adolph of Salina, Kansas driving a Dodge special owned by Johnny Lee of Wichita, Kansas

 

September 8, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – Athletic Park in Newton, Kansas

          These races were promoted by Merle Warren

Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais did not compete in these races.  An article in the local newspaper stated the reason being that Mais had torn his car up at the races in Salina, Kansas on Labor Day, 1921 and was not able to get his car repaired in time to compete in Newton.  He got his car repaired but he had actually chosen to compete in the two-day event at Ottawa then instead.

Feature race winner:  Harold R. Peterson of Wichita, Kansas in a Lassen special Dodge owned by William Henry “Bill” Lassen, also of Wichita.

 

Johnnie Mais already had a new and greatly updated, 16-valve Dodge special racing car being constructed at the Ostenberg garage on North Fifth Street in Salina, Kansas when his older Dodge was so severely damaged in the 50-lap “Free-for-All” race at Kenwood Park Speedway in Salina on Labor Day of 1921, so he decided to get busy and get the new car finished up in time for the upcoming races at the Franklin County Fairgrounds in Ottawa, Kansas.

 

September 8, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds in Ottawa, Kansas

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 9, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds in Ottawa, Kansas

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to Edward Elliston of Lawrence, Kansas who was driving a Ford in the 1st 6-car, 5-mile heat race.

                        Mais won the 2nd 6-car, 5-mile heat race over Edward Elliston in 5 minutes, 37.0 seconds which was a new track record.

                        Mais won the 3rd 6-car, 5-mile heat race over Edward Elliston.in 5 minutes, 43.0 seconds.

                        Mais won the “Free-for-All” race over Edward Elliston.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

September 11, 1921 – 2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

           Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais won the 20-mile race followed by Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas.

                        Mais won the 100-mile race followed by Leonard Kerbs.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

September 12, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Scott County Fairgrounds at Scott City, Kansas

           Car:  Mais entered his own 16 valve Dodge special #24

             Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 16, 1921 - ½ mile dirt oval – Mid-America Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais and Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas were among the entries in these races but they were denied permission to compete upon their arrival as neither was a member in good standing of I.M.C.A.  After much often heated debate and with the crowd clearly on the side of Mais and Kerbs, race officials agreed to allow Mais and Kerbs to participate in a 3-mile match race against I.M.C.A. regular, John Raimey of Nashville, Tennessee.  Raimey won the race in 2 minutes, 33.4 seconds.  Mais finished ¼ of a lap behind.  Kerbs had dropped out of the race at the end of the 2nd lap.  After the race, Mais, Kerbs, and Raimey engaged in a fist fight in front of the grandstands.  The fight ended abruptly when Raimey threw 2 monkey wrenches at his antagonists.  At that point, the local police intervened and escorted both Mais and Kerbs from the fairgrounds forbidding either to participate in any further events that day.

Feature race winner:  Jack Stratton in an Essex special

 

September 24, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Guthrie Fairgrounds at Guthrie, Oklahoma

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

          Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 28, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Guthrie Fairgrounds at Guthrie, Oklahoma

Elfrieda Mais and an

unidentified person in

the Mais special

Bob Lawrence collection

 

          Attendance:  “Standing room only crowd”

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

          Finish:  Mais had the fastest 1-mile time trial.

Mais finished 2nd in the 5-mile race for light cars behind Dick Calhoun in the “Alimony Ann” Ford.

                        Mais finished 2nd in the Australian Pursuit behind Dick Calhoun.

Feature race winner:  Dick Calhoun of Cleveland, Oklahoma in the “Alimony Ann” Ford owned by J. O. Dowell also of Cleveland, Oklahoma.

 

October 5, 1921 – 1½ mile dirt squared circle – Meridian Speedway in Wichita, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to W. W. Brown of Kansas City, Missouri driving a Peerless 8 in the 6-car “miss and out” race.

                        Mais won the 15-car, 60-mile feature race over W. W. Brown.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas although he was claiming that Indianapolis, Indiana was his home

 

October 7, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – City Park Racetrack in Council Grove, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais had the fastest time in time trials over Harold Roller in a Dodge special; Mais time for 2-laps being 1 minute, 7.0 seconds.

                        “A large crowd” saw Mais and Roller finish 1st and 2nd in every race run on this afternoon but it is currently unknown which finished in which position in which race.

            Feature race winner:  Either Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas or Harold Roller of Abilene, Kansas

 

November, 13, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Osage Speedway at Hominy, Oklahoma

            Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais was left in critical condition after the race car he was driving, turned over.  He received a broken collar bone and internal injuries.

 

Spring, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Osage Speedway at Hominy, Oklahoma

            Car:  Mais entered his own Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais set a new 2-lap track record in time trials but no further results of these races have been located to date.

 

March 31, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Anthony Downs at Anthony, Kansas

            Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Between 1,200 and 1,500 fans saw Mais run the fastest time in time trials over Johnnie Lee of Wichita, Kansas in a Dodge special.  Mais only required 1 minute, 9.0 seconds to run 2 laps.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 1st 5-mile heat race behind Johnnie Lee and Harold Peterson in a Dodge.  The advertised purse for 3rd place was $25 but promoter F. R. Dunlavy only paid Mais $12.50.

            Mais won the 2nd 5-mile heat race in 5 minutes, 58.0 seconds over Harold Peterson.  The advertised purse for this victory was $75 but Dunlavy only paid Mais $37.50.

            Mais won the 10-mile “Free-for-All” in over Johnnie Lee in 12 minutes, 11.0 seconds.  The advertised purse for this victory was $100 but Dunlavy only paid Mais $50.

            Mais won the 20-mile “Free-for-All” over Johnnie Lee in 24 minutes, 43 seconds.  The advertised purse for this victory was $225 but Dunlavy only paid Mais $112.50.  Needless to say, the racers (and especially Mais) were highly upset with Dunlavy.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas although he was claiming that Indianapolis, Indiana was his home.

 

April 1, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Anthony Downs at Anthony, Kansas

Elfrieda Mais in the

Mais special #24

Bob Lawrence collection

 

            Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

These races were canceled by the promoter, F. R. Dunlavy, due to poor attendance at the races held here the day before.

 

June 4, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

          These races were promoted by George W. Woods

          Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

June 11, 1922 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Osage Speedway at Hominy, Oklahoma

          J. F. Hatton was the promoter of these races

            Car:  Mais entered his own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

July 4, 1922 - ½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds  at North Platte, Nebraska – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Attendance:  “Over 6,000 racing fans” saw these races promoted by J. J. Crawford of North Platte, Nebraska.

Finish:  Mais tied for 2nd place in time trials with a Duesenberg driven by George Kirchuber of Brooklyn, New York with a 1-lap time of 33.6 seconds.  The fastest time of the day was run by Ira Vail for which he received $500 from the purse.

            Mais was paid $250 from the purse for finishing 2nd behind Ira Vail in the 5-mile race.

                        Mais received $600 for finishing 3rd behind winner Ira Vail and John Boling of Mounds, Oklahoma in the 25-mile race.

           Feature race winner:  Ira Vail of Brooklyn, New York driving a Duesenberg

 

July 28, 1922 - ½ mile dirt oval – Meade County Fairgrounds at Sturgis, South Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24.  Gus Schrader was apparently also driving a John Mais Dodge special.

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to Gus Schrader in the 25-mile Black Hills Sweepstakes which paid him $350 from the purse.  Schrader won $600.

Feature race winner:  Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa

 

September 4, 1922 – 1½ mile dirt squared circle – Meridian Speedway in Wichita, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Total Purse:  $2,690 – For winning three of the races run on this afternoon, Mais collected a total of $1,350 of that purse.

            Finish:  Mais won the 9-mile open race over Frank McAllister of Wichita, Kansas in a Dodge special in a time of 7 minutes, 33.0 seconds.

                        Mais won the 18-mile open race in 18 minutes, 23.0 seconds.

                        Mais won the 60-mile special feature race over Scott VanOrdstrand of Wichita, Kansas in a Marmon in 52 minutes, 48.0 seconds.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas although he was claiming that Indianapolis, Indiana was his home

 

September 8, 1922 - ½ mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds in Ottawa, Kansas

The total cost of the races, including not only the purse but such things as “prizes, premiums, free acts, music and entertainment” was estimated by the fair board to be $15,000 but, thanks to great attendance, the fair still made a profit on them.

            Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais had the fastest time of the 13 cars that took time trials with a 1-lap run of 33 seconds and he ran the 11th mile in the 15-mile “Free-for-All” race unofficially in 1 minute, 3.0 seconds.

                        Mais led every lap in winning this 11-car, 5-mile “Free-for-All” race in 5 minutes, 51.75 seconds over John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

                        Mais led every lap in winning this 6-car, 7-mile “Free-for-All” race in 8 minutes, 8.0 seconds over John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

                        Mais led every lap in winning this 5-car, 10-mile “Free-for-All” race in 10 minutes, 32.0 seconds over John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Mais won the 7 car, 15-mile “Free-for-All” race in 17 minutes, 16.5 seconds over John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Boling lead the 1st 2 laps before Mais passed him for the lead and went on to win the race.  Verne Ellis of Kansas City, Missouri was hospitalized in serious condition after his “Chevrolet plowed through the back-turn fence, jumped a ditch and turned over early in this event.”

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

November 5, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Gulf Coast Speedway at Houston, Texas

            Car & Driver:  Johnnie Lee drove Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Lee finished 3rd, 12.2 seconds behind winner Phil “Red” Schafer in a Duesenberg.  Carl Graham finished 2nd in a Ried Oakland.

                        Lee won the 12-mile “Free-for-All” for non-winners.

                        Lee finished 3rd in the 24-mile “Free-for-All”, 28.0 seconds behind winner Glenn Breed.  Bob Davis finished 2nd in the Reid Davis Oakland special.

            Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6

 

May 6, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval Gulf Coast Speedway at Houston, Texas

Cars and Drivers:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #21

Finish:  Mais won a 12-mile heat race.

            Mais won the 24-mile feature race.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

May 26, 1923 – 1½ mile dirt oval East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

            Attendance:  8,000 announced by L. A. Hoskins, race promoter

Cars and Drivers:  Mais entered a 16-valve Dodge special #21 for Roy Huston of Houston, Texas to drive and another 16-valve Dodge special #14 for him to drive himself.  Jack Saunders had entered his own Ford but it appears the Dodge special Mais had entered for himself is the one that he turned over to Jack Saunders to drive in the races in place of Saunderes’ own Ford that Saunders had entered but which did not compete.

Finish:  Harry H. Norris’ #7 Hudson “mounted” the Mais owned Dodge special #21 driven by Roy Huston in the 12-mile heat race.  Huston’s Dodge special carried Norris several hundred feet before the 2 cars came to a stop.  Norris’ Hudson was heavily damaged.  Houston suffered an injured shoulder and a crippled Dodge special putting him out of the race.  Jack Saunder of Houston won that 12-mile race in 10.37.8 seconds in another Dodge special owned by Mais over Henry Bradshaw who was driving a Marmon #12 owned by W. W. Foulner (or Feulner) of Houston, Texas.

            Huston’s injuries put him out for the afternoon so Saunders drove the Dodge special #21 assigned to Huston in the consolation race.  Saunders won that 9-car, 12-mile race in 11 minutes, 52.4 seconds over Frank Miller who was driving his own Mercer #10 and finished 1.2 seconds behind Saunders.

            Saunders finished 3rd in the 24-mile feature race, 2 minutes, 4.2 seconds behind winner Bill Melaun .  Mike Guseman finished a close 2nd in a L. L. Walker owned Fronty Ford #40 from Goose Creek, Texas.

            Feature race winner:  Bill Melaun of Houston, Texas driving a Silfo Fronty Ford #1 owned by H. L. Silverstein of Houston, Texas

 

June 3, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval Gulf Coast Speedway at Houston, Texas

Cars and Drivers:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #14 for Dick Calhoun of Cleveland, Oklahoma to drive and a 16-valve Dodge special #21 for himself to drive.

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 2nd race behind winner Glenn Breed in his Hudson Super 6 and Dick Calhoun.

            Mais finished 2nd to Glenn Breed in the final race.  Calhoun finished 3rd in that race followed by Bill Melaun in the Silfo Fronty Ford #1 owned by H. L. Silverstein.  The cars driven by both Breed and Melaun died at the starting line and had to be push-started by by-standers after the race began.  That gave the 14 other competitors a head start on the two.  Melaun got away from the starting line first but Breen soon followed and both made up ground quickly

Feature race winner:  Glenn Breed driving own Hudson Super 6 #5

 

June 17, 1923 – 1½ mile dirt oval East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

            Attendance:  “several thousand”

Total purse:  $1,575

Cars and Drivers:  Mais entered a 16-valve Dodge special for Cotton Grable of Houston, Texas to drive, another 16-valve Dodge special with Jack McCarver named as driver but, when it came time to race, only 1 of Mais’ Dodge specials finished in the money and that 1 was driving by Dick Calhoun of Cleveland, Oklahoma.

Finish:  Calhoun had the 3rd fastest time of 1 minute, 9.0 seconds in time trials behind quick timer Glenn Breed in a Hudson and Jack Saunders in a Silfo Fronty Ford #1 owned by H. L. Silverstein of Houston, Texas.

            Calhoun won the 9-lap race over Glenn Breed in 9 minutes, 11.6 seconds to collect $300 of the prize money.

            Starting in the pole position, Calhoun won the 18-lap feature race in 19 minutes, 6.4 seconds over a fast closing Glenn Breed who had started in last place and still finished only 7.2 seconds behind Calhoun whose victory was worth $500 from the purse.

Feature race winner:  Dick Calhoun of Cleveland, Oklahoma in a 16-valve Dodge special owned by Johnnie Mais.

 

July 25-27, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval Meade County Fairgrounds at Sturgis, South Dakota

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located

           

August 10, 1923 – 1-mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds  at Franklin, Nebraska

            Finish:  Mais won each of the 3 heat races for Class B automobiles.

            Feature race winner:   John Boling of Tulsa, Oklahoma

 

August 31, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Republic County Fairgrounds in Belleville, Kansas

          Car:  Mais’ own Mais special 16-valve Dodge

Finish:  Mais won the 10-lap Free-for-All in 5 minutes, 51.5 seconds.

Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais of Salina, Kansas

 

November 11, 1923 – 1½ mile dirt oval East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

Attendance:  4,500

Total purse:  $2,035

Cars and Drivers:  Mais entered a 16-valve Dodge special #21 for driver Johnny Lee of San Angelo, Texas to drive and a Chalmers #9 for driver Gus Schrader of Chicago, Illinois to drive.

Finish:  Schrader won $200 for first place in the 2nd 4 car, 12-mile heat race for cars with 200 cu. in. or more.  He covered the distance in 9:07.0.  John Lee of Wichita, Kansas finished 2nd in this race, 11.0 seconds behind Schrader, to win $125.

            Schrader finished 2nd, 4.0 seconds behind Bill Wade in the 21-lap “Free-for-All” to collect $250 from the purse. Schrader lead the race until the 14th lap and before Wade then pulled ahead on the 15th lap.   Johnny Lee finished 3rd in this race, 41.0 seconds behind Schrader, to collect $75 from the purse.

Feature race winner:  Bill Wade of New Orleans, Louisiana drove a #28 Studebaker owned by the Carter Auto Company.

 

January 20, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  #13 Texaco special

            Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the results of these races.

Feature race winner:  Either Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California or Fred Lecklider of Toledo, Ohio depending on which source you believe.

 

January 27, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his Mais special for driver Harry Hooker

            Finish:  These races were canceled due to rain.

 

February 3, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his Mais special for driver Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                                           

            Finish:  Schrader’s name does not appear in the results of this race.

Feature race winner:  Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California

 

February 10, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his Mais special for driver Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                                           

            Finish:  Schrader finished 2nd in the feature race and in front of Fred Frame who finished 3rd.

Feature race winner:  Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California

 

February 17, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his Mais special for driver Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                                           

            Finish:  Schrader finished 3nd in the helmet dash

                        Schrader won a 15-lap heat race.

            Feature race winner:   Fred Lecklider of Toledo, Ohio

 

February 24, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais entered his Mais special for driver Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa                                                           

            Finish:  Schrader’s name does not appear in the results of these races.

Feature race winner:  Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California

 

March 2, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Among the 51 entries in these races was Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa driving the Mais special

            Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

            Feature race winner:  Sig Haugdahl of Albert Lea, Minnesota

Elfrieda and Ray

LaPlante in 1932

Alberts family collection

loaned to Jeff Adams

by Dean Hoffman

 

March 9, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa drove the Mais special

            Finish:  Few results of these races have been located to date.

            Feature race winner:  Eddie Meyer of Redlands, California

 

March 16, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Records are unclear if Gus Schrader of Cedar Rapids, Iowa drove the Mais special or the Sherman special on this date.

            Finish:  Schrader finished 3rd in a 15-lap heat race.

                        Schrader finished 3rd in the feature race.

            Feature race winner:  Leon Duray of Cleveland, Ohio

 

April 20, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway  near Los Angeles, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mais was listed as the driver of a car known as the “Rocky Kansas death car” by a local newspaper.  One source suggests this car may have been one of the Junior specials that belonged to Fred Lecklider of Toledo, Ohio.

            Finish:  Mais was involved in a wreck with Ed Winfield in the first heat race.

            Feature race winner:  The Easter Sweepstakes race was won by Sig Haugdahl

  

June 8, 1924 – 1-mile dirt oval – Culver City Speedway  at Culver City, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

            Finish:  Mais turned in the 3rd fastest time in time trials.

                        Mais finished 2nd in the dash.

            Feature race winner:  Babe Strapp of San Antonio, Texas

 

June 15, 1924 – 1-mile dirt oval – Culver City Speedway  at Culver City, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Hudson special #33

            Finish:  Mais won the feature race.

            Feature race winner:   Johnnie Mais

 

July 4, 1924 – 1-mile dirt oval – Culver City Speedway  at Culver City, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

          Car:  Mais’ own Hudson special #33

            Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the published results of these races.

            Feature race winner:  Ed Winfield

 

July 17, 1924 – dirt oval – Tulia Speedway  south of Tulia, Texas

          Car:  Mais’ own Hudson special #33

            Finish:  Mais won the feature race over C. A. Gibb of Lubbock, Texas.

            Feature race winner:   Johnnie Mais

 

1924 (exact date currently undetermined) – ½ mile dirt oval – Independence Fairgrounds at Independence, Missouri

          Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais won the feature race.

            Feature race winner:  Johnnie Mais

 

August 11, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval Phelps County Fairgrounds at Holdrege, Nebraska

          Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd to Noel Bullock in the Sweepstakes race.

Feature race winner:  Noel Bullock of Madrid, Nebraska

 

August 14, 1924 – 1-mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds  at Franklin, Nebraska

            Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

            Finish:  Mais set the fastest time in time trials at 49.0 seconds.

                        Mais finished 2nd to Walter Higley in the feature race.

            Feature race winner:   Walter Higley of Coffeyville, Kansas

 

September 24, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

            Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 4th in a heat race.

            Mais finished 2nd in another heat race.

            Mais finished 3rd in the feature race.

            Feature race winner:  Phil “Red” Shafer of Des Moines, Iowa

 

September 26, 1924 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

            Car:  Mais’ own 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Mais finished 2nd in a heat race.

            Mais won another heat race.

            Mais finished 3rd in the feature race.

            Feature race winner:  Phil “Red” Shafer of Des Moines, Iowa

 

April 11, 1925 – ½ mile dirt oval – Texas State Fairgrounds in Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by A. A. A.

Car:  Mais entered a 24-valve Hudson known as the Richards special

            Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the published results of these races.

Feature race winner:  Raffael “Ralph” DePalma of Los Angeles, California

 

June 14, 1925 – 1½ mile dirt oval East Texas Motor Speedway  between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

Mais was both a co-promoter and entrant of these races but his name does not appear in the published results.

Feature race winner:  Roy Huston of Houston, Texas

 

July 11, 1925 – 1-mile dirt oval – Fair Park Speedway  at Dallas, Texas

JOHNNIE MAIS ENTERS AUTO RACES

 

Johnnie Mais in his Mais special #24. This

 newspaper ad appeared in the:

Paris (Texas) Morning News

November 27, 1918 – page - 3

            Finish:  Mais’ name does not appear in the published results of these races.

            Feature race winner:  Harry Milburn

 

August 8, 1925 – 1-mile dirt oval – Oil Belt Speedway at Breckenridge, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

            Attendance:  “several thousand”

            Car:  John Lee of San Angelo, Texas in Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special and Mais’ own Hudson special to drive himself

Finish:  Lee set the fastest time in time trials with 80.4 seconds which was a new track record.  George Souders had the 2nd fastest time.

            Lee started on the pole and won the 1st 5-mile heat race for the 8 fastest cars in time trials in a time of 5 minutes, 4.4 seconds over Norman York.

            Mais finished 3rd in the 8-car, 2nd 5-mile heat race behind winner George Souders and Harry Milburn in a Duesenberg.  Mais was 20.0 seconds behind Sanders at the finish.

            Lee finished 2nd and Mais 3rd in the 10-mile feature race behind winner George Souders.  Mais was 37.0 seconds behind Souders at the finish.

            Feature race winner:  George Souders of Covington, Indiana driving a Chevrolet special

 

September 23, 1925 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais’ Hudson special

Finish:  Mais won an 8-mile heat race in the track record time of 7 minutes, 39.4 seconds.

            Feature race winner:  Frank Lockhart of Inglewood, California

 

September 25, 1925 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

            Total purse:  $2,500.

          Car:  Mais’ Hudson special

Finish:  Mais finished 3rd in the 8-mile race behind winner Herbert Hass of San Angelo, Texas (who was driving the Hudson Super 6 that he purchased from Glenn Breed when Breed retired from driving) and Johnnie Lee of San Angelo, Texas.

                        Mais finished 2nd in the 7-mile race behind Phil “Red” Shafer of Des Moines, Iowa.

            Feature race winner:  Frank Lockhart of Inglewood, California

 

September 26, 1925 – ½ mile dirt oval Douglas Fairgrounds  at Douglas, Arizona

Car:  “Slim” Harper drove Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special #24

Feature race winner:  “Slim” Harper of Longmont, Colorado

 

October 2, 1925 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – Central West Texas Fairgrounds at Haskell, Texas

          Car:  “Slim” Harper of Longmont, Colorado drove Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Harper set a new 2-lap track record in time trials of 75.0 seconds.  When time trials had concluded, Harper’s time was only 3rd best behind quick timer and new track record holder John Gerber who ran 2-laps in his Whippet in 73.0 seconds.  2nd fastest time of the day was just over 74 seconds turned in by Phil “Red” Shafer.

            Feature race winner:  John Gerber of Stanwood, Iowa

 

October 3, 1925 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – Central West Texas Fairgrounds at Haskell, Texas

          Car:  “Slim” Harper of Longmont, Colorado drove Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special #24

Finish:  Few results of these races have been found to date.

            Feature race winner:  John Gerber of Stanwood, Iowa

 

October 4, 1925 – ½ mile dirt oval – Wichita County Fairgrounds  at Wichita Falls, Texas

Car:  “Slim” Harper drove Mais’ 16-valve Dodge special #24

Feature race winner:  “Slim” Harper of Longmont, Colorado

 

November 11, 1925 – 2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway in San Antonio, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais entered a Hudson named the Douglas special #100 although one sources says the Douglass special #100 was a Dodge rather than a Hudson.)

            Finish:  Mais won a heat race.

            Feature race winner:  Jimmy Lawrence of San Antonio, Texas who was driving a Fronty Ford

 

February 22, 1926 – 2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway in San Antonio, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  Mais entered a Hudson named the Douglas special #100 although one sources says the Douglass special #100 was a Dodge rather than a Hudson.)

            Finish:  Mais does not appear in the published results of these races.

            Feature race winner:  Harry Milburn

 

May 30, 1926 – 1-mile dirt oval – Albuquerque Fairgrounds at Albuquerque, New Mexico

This ad appeared on page 8 of the

July 19, 1918 issue of the ”Belleville

Telescope and Freeman” newspaper.

The picture was probably staged and

taken at the Republic County

Fairgrounds and the driver of car #3

is probably Rex Kent of Concordia,

Kansas who both promoted these races

 and competed in them in a Studebaker.

The driver of #24 is Johnnie Mais in his

Mais special.

 

 

          Car:  Mais entered two cars, one for him to drive and one for “Slim” Harper.

Finish:  The car Mais drove suffered burnt bearings in time trials and the car driven by “Slim” Harper suffered from mechanical trouble keeping both cars from starting in any of the scheduled races.

            Feature race winner:  George Souders of Covington, Indiana

 

July 5, 1926 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Mais was entered to drive a Dodge special that may have belonged to “Slim” Harper and been purchased from Mais.  Mais also entered a Duesenberg-Bugatti special to be driven by Charles “Chuck” Anderson.

Finish:  Only a few skimpy results of these races have been located to date.  The 48-lap feature was won by Frank Lockhart in a former Bennie Hill Miller in 28 minutes, 23.4 seconds.  Fred Lecklider finished 2nd.

            Feature race winner:  Frank Lockhart of Inglewood, California

 

September 6, 1926 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cushing Speedway Park at Cushing, Oklahoma

          Car:  Mais’ entry does not specify what vehicle he would drive

Finish:  Only a few skimpy results of these races have been located to date.  The feature race was won by Dick Calhoun with George Souders of Indianapolis, Indiana finishing in 2nd place.

            Feature race winner:  Dick Calhoun of Cleveland, Oklahoma

 

September 22, 1926 – 5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

          Car:  A Mais special #1 for driver John Lindsey and a Mais special #2 to be driven by Johnnie Mais himself.

Finish:  Lindsey was 11th fastest in time trials but neither Lindsey nor Mais are mentioned in any more of the skimpy results that have been located to date.  Chet Gardner won the 32-lap feature race in his own Rajo over Pete De Paolo in the White Miller.

            Feature race winner:  Chet Gardner in his own Rajo Ford

 

 

Johnnie Mais was residing in Houston, Texas in 1923.  He married to his 2nd wife, Juanita Peggy (Chancey) Mais, sometime after that and they made their home 1st in Kansas City, Missouri.  They raised a girl who had been born c1921 in Texas and, since Johnnie Mais was still married to Elfrieda Mais when this girl was born, she was most likely Juanita Mais’ natural daughter and Johnnie Mais’ step-daughter.  She was known by “Louella (or Luella) L. Mais” as her maiden name though.  The Mais moved to Dallas, Texas where Johnnie became a naturalized U.S. citizen on February 9, 1931.  The Maises were in Atlanta, Georgia by 1933 where Johnnie remained an agent for Winfield carburetors.  The Mais family stayed in Atlanta until 1940.  Juanita Mais had been born April 6, 1895 in Texas and she passed away on March 28, 1995 in Canoga Park, California, just 9 days short of her 100th birthday.  Johnnie and Juanita were divorced in 1941 in Duval County, Florida.  Johnnie Mais was still residing in Florida as late as 1945 but he had moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by the summer of 1947 where he and partners Johnnie Yates, Malcom Richmond and Lorendo Juinepero had opened a bar.  One of their employees was a well-known east coast race driver named Charles J. “Rex” Records (c1915-1961) who tended bar for a living while working the graveyard shift so he could race midgets in the area.

 

Autograph signed in 1917

 

After visiting relatives in Germany in 1952, Johnnie Mais returned home in the fall of that year sailing from France on the steam ship “United States“.  He then traveled to his home then in San Diego, California.  Mais resided in Kansas City, Missouri from 1957 through 1960 but then returned to Santa Monica, California which is his last known address in the U.S.  He obtained another American passport on April 25, 1960 and was residing with a nephew, August Mais, in Koblenz-Moselweiss, Germany when he suffered a heart attack and passed away on May 26, 1961.  Mais was buried in the Cemetery of Koblenz-Moselweiss at Koblenz-Moselweiss, Germany.

 

Burial plots in Germany are leased for duration of 30 years.  After that time has passed, the cemetery attempts to contact relatives of the deceased for a renewal of the lease.  If there is no renewal, the grave is reassigned.  That appears to have happened to Mais’ grave when that cemetery was renovated in 1996.  The grave no longer exists and the cemetery has no record of his burial.

 

 

 

 

 

            Webmaster’s note:  Johnnie Mais’ racing career seems to have gone in reverse compared to the driving careers of others.  While he claimed to have raced extensively in Europe before immigrating to America; those claims are unlikely given his young age when he was in Europe.  If one discounts any possibility of his having raced in Europe, then his 1st start as a driver in any kind of race was in the 1915 Indianapolis “500”.  His 2nd attempt was in the 2nd largest race of his extensive career, the inaugural 500-mile race on the board track at Speedway Park in Maywood, Illinois in June of 1915.  When he did obtain enough speed to make the field at the Maywood race, he moved to the Midwest and competed in I.M.C.A. races before turning his attention to non-sanctioned dirt track “big car” racing.

            It is obvious that Mais was an accomplished automotive engineer, just without a degree which was common in those days.  He was also considered to be formidable competition on the dirt racetracks of the Midwest by his peers.

           Mais was probably most famous for his role of being Mr. Elfrieda Mais as his wife was arguably more famous in auto racing circles than Johnnie was.  He spent much of his own career keeping her in good equipment and traveling around the country to race dates that she had booked.

            There are still many unanswered questions about Johnnie Mais that I am seeking answers to such as:

            Did he ever compete in an auto race before his start in the 1915 Indianapolis “500”?

            How long did he compete in auto racing?  It may be just a coincidence but I have stopped locating newspaper articles about his racing career at about the same time as current copyright laws take affect making the number of newspapers available for such research to be inaccessible.

            When and why did Johnnie Mais quit driving race cars?

            What activities did Johnnie Mais participate in once he gave up driving racing cars?

            Whatever became of Louella (or Luella) L. Mais” who was probably Johnnie Mais’ step-daughter?

            Whatever became of Elfrieda Mais’ 4th husband, Ray LaPlante, after he moved to Tampa, Florida and went to work for the Roller Spring & Brake Company owned by Harold S. “Doc” Roller?

            If you know the answers to any of this, please let me know about it.

 

 

 

 

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 Thank you to

Michael Ferner and Bob Mays