Harold Stanley "Doc" Roller

 

Bob Mays photo collection

 

  

Harold Roller was born on March 27, 1893 at Brookville, Ohio, the youngest child of Gustav Adolph Frederich Roller (1848-1920) and his wife, Sarah Jane (Fox) Roller (1853-1922).  Adolph was a first generation German immigrant to America.  By early 1895, the family had moved to Logan, Kansas and by 1900, the family had moved to Lecompton, Kansas.  Adolph had worked as a harness maker and buggy salesman but he and Sarah separated not long after they arrived at Lecompton.  Adolph went back to Ohio while Sarah moved to Topeka, Kansas with the children and found work there as a seamstress.

Harold Roller had moved to Topeka, Kansas by 1912 where he learned about automobiles by working for the W. H. Imes Automobile Co.  For a short time in 1914, Roller and a partner, Albert Walker Quisenberry (1892-1962), operated a taxi & touring car business in Topeka.

Roller and Ethel Pauline (Baker) Knox were married on August 10, 1914 at Savannah, Missouri and were the parents of four children:  Richard Henry Knox (1907-1991) who changed his surname to Roller after Harold and Ethel were married; Estella Bernice Roller (1915-1917); Gilbert Raymond Roller (1917-1929); and Ruth Arlene (Roller) Bracewell (1934-2004).

Roller began to participate in area automobile races early in 1917.  About all that is known about his early bobtail racing cars is that they had 4-cylinder Ford engines equipped with 16-valve Roof heads and that they were known to be reliably fast.  The following is an incomplete listing of some of the races that Roller entered:

 

August 20, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller finished first in the five-mile “light car race” in 7 minutes, 12.0 seconds.  Cliff Young of Salina, Kansas finished in second place while a Mr. Short of Salina was third.

 

August 22, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

            Roller had the fourth fastest time in time trials with 1 minute, 9.4 seconds for two laps and behind fast timer Glenn Breed (1880-1960) of Salina, Kansas; Johnnie Mais of Indianapolis, Indiana and Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas.

Roller won the first 5-mile heat followed by Rex Kent, Johnnie Mais and Glenn Breed.

Roller finished in second place in the second heat behind Glenn Breed.  Rex Kent was third followed by Johnnie Mais.  That five mile contest was run in 5 minutes, 50.6 seconds

Roller and owner / driver Glenn Breed in his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special #1 were fighting for the lead on the final lap of the third 5-mile heat race when “one machine hooked the rear of the other”.  Both cars crashed through a board fence with Roller being thrown from his car, across a road and into a tub of water at a pop stand.  Breed’s Hudson broke off a 9-inch electric pole at the base and then somersaulted twice throwing its driver from the car.  His gas tank exploded in flames but, miraculously, neither driver was seriously injured and the fire was extinguished quickly.  The official timekeepers reported the time after only nine laps was 5 minutes, 8.4 seconds.  The veteran Breed was a top driver on the local racetracks at the time so it was unexpected to see him challenged for the victory by a rookie.  The total purse for these races was $690.

 

Harold Roller and his bride had moved to Lincoln Center, Kansas (later known as just Lincoln, Kansas) by the end of the 1917 and found lodging with the family of August O. Bahls (1884-1974).  Roller took a job as an automobile mechanic at the local Ford garage owned by John S. Stover (1870-1942).

It is unknown just who challenged who, or who put up the money, but a rematch (grudge race?) between Harold Roller and Glenn Breed was arranged complete with a substantial side bet.

 

Topeka Daily Capital

October 17, 1917 – Page 3

 

 

September 14, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds at Lincoln, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4

The total purse was $500 but no record has been found as to how Roller did in those races.

 

October 5, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Clay County Fairgrounds at Clay Center, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller won the “Free-for-All” race followed by Johnnie Mais in second place, Rex Kent in third place and Bob Cusick in fourth place.

 

October 20, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds  at Lincoln, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Glenn Breed drove his black and white 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special #1 and collected $1,000 for winning the first two of a best two-out-of-three series of match races over Roller.  Both had been required to post $1,000 in cash with a local bank in case of forfeiture.

 

Early in 1918, Abilene, Kansas Ford agent Charles D. Cruse (1889-1965) traveled to Lincoln, Kansas and made Roller a flattering offer to move to Abilene and work as a mechanic in Cruse’s garage.  Roller accepted the offer and the Rollers were residents of Abilene by June of that year.

 

July 25, 1918

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller finished third in time trials behind Glenn Breed of Salina, Kansas and Rex Kent of Concordia, Kansas.  Next, he won the 3-mile heat race.  He then won the second and third 2-mile heat races.  Finally, Roller finished second to Breed in the 5-mile final race.

 

August 23, 1918

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds in Belleville, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

This race consisted of three 10-lap heat races with the finishing places in each counting toward the overall standings for the day.  A $500 purse was paid out to the overall winner.  Roller, driving a 16-valve Ford special, won all three heat races with his best time of 6 minutes, 9 seconds coming in the first heat.

 

September 6, 1918

1-mile dirt oval – Oakdale Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4

Roller ran the second fastest time in time trials behind that of Glenn Breed, when he turned the mile dirt oval in 1 minute, 9.4 seconds.  Roller then ran third in the first heat 5-mile heat race behind Breed and Bert Nelson who were both driving Hudsons.  Roller won the second 5-mile heat race in 6 minutes, 4 seconds and the third 5-mile heat ract in 6 minutes, 21 seconds.  Finally, Roller won the “Free-for-All” race.

 

Fall, 1918

 

Harold Roller and his Ford

Abilene Daily Chronicle

June 20, 1918 – Page 2

 

½ mile dirt oval Lincoln County Fairgrounds at North Platte, Nebraska

            No results of these races have been located to date.

 

July 4, 1919

½ mile dirt oval Lincoln County Fairgrounds at North Platte, Nebraska

          Roller’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

September 1, 1919

½ mile dirt oval Lincoln County Fairgrounds at North Platte, Nebraska

          Roller’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

September 3, 1919

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Roller drove a “Double Engine” Ford special.

This was opening day for the Kenwood Park Speedway.  15,000 people saw Canadian Harry Dempster’s Peugot flagged the winner of the 26-mile Victory Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” race in 29 minutes, 39.2 seconds to take home the largest share of the advertised $1,000 purse.  Due to a major uproar of disapproval for their decision, Roller was also paid $1,000 which was equal to the amount that Dempster received for the victory.  Note:  The car that Roller drove in this two-day program of races featured two Model T Ford engines welded together end-to-end.  An error in the scoring cause the race to run one mile farther than the scheduled 25-mile distance.

 

September 3, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

Roller drove a “Double Engine” Ford special.

            It would have required some hustling but Concordia is not all that far from Salina, Kansas where Roller had raced earlier that day.  Roller finished second to Johnnie Mais in in the “Free-for-All race.

 

September 4, 1919

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Roller drove a “Double Engine” Ford special.

Roller was the overall winner of the two-day contest which paid him $1,000 in prize money each day for winning the 25-mile Victory Sweepstakes “Free-for-All” race in 28 minutes, 18.4 seconds.  He won that race on this day in 28 minutes, 18.4 seconds, just barely finishing ahead of George ClarkGlenn Breed had started on the pole position and led the first 15 laps of the final before “throwing a tire” and loosing 5 minutes in the pits replacing it.

 

September 4, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds at Concordia, Kansas

Roller drove a “Double Engine” Ford special.

            Roller won the Free-for-All race.

 

September 11, 1919

½ mile dirt ovalCarter County Fairgrounds at Ardmore, Oklahoma

Roller “blew up” and was unable to finish the 10-mile final race “in any kind of shape.”

 

September 27, 1919

½ mile dirt oval Lincoln County Fairgrounds at North Platte, Nebraska

Roller’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

January 16, 1920

Beach oval course "between Pass-a-Grille and the Casino" on St. Petersburg Beach, Florida

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

            A field of thirteen cars was entered.  Roller "got off to a flying start", led the entire distance, and was declared to be the overall winner which was touted as the biggest victory of his racing career.  For the feat, Roller collected $2,500 as his share of the purse.  Little more is known of these races though.  Brief newspapers accounts do say that Harold Roller was able to average 105 m.p.h. for two miles on the beach course.  That same source also states that Roller was able to reach a speed of 115 m.p.h. later that same year on a six-mile straight stretch of that same beach.

 

            The following appeared on page 4 of the March 11, 1920 issue of the Abilene Daily Chronicle:

            “Harold Roller, Abilene’s well known auto racer, has been having a big season in Florida this winter and has won several important matches at the Southern resorts.  He is matched against a Duesenberg at Palm Beach next week.  His opponent was one of the principal drivers in the big Indianapolis races last year.”

 

April 23-24, 1920

 

North Platte Tribune

July 1, 1919 – Page 4

 

½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

            Roller entered his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4

            Roller won a five-mile preliminary race but engine trouble kept him from being able to start the feature event.

 

May 15 – 16, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

There was a $2,000 total purse posted for these races but they were canceled due to flooding in the area.

 

May 21, 1920

½ mile dirt oval Pittsburg County Fairgrounds at McAlester, Oklahoma

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

            Roller won the 5-mile preliminary race.

            Roller finished second to Johnnie Mais of Dallas, Texas in the 8-mile feature race.

 

June 15, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Great Bend Fairgrounds at Great Bend, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

            Roller won the four-car, ten-mile Free-for-All race in 12 minutes, 24.0 seconds.

 

July 4, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds at North Platte, Nebraska

Roller finished second to King Rhiley of Oshkosh, Nebraska in the first heat race.  Rhiley went on the win the feature race this day but there is no further mention of Roller in the published race results.

 

September 4, 1920

1-mile dirt oval – Galesburg District Fairgrounds at Galesburg, Illinois

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

There was $1,900 in total purse posted for these races put on by the Tri-State Racing Association of Keokuk, Iowa.  6,000 people saw Roller compete as one of the eight drivers to start in one of the two 25-mile heat races and in the 50-mile feature race that was won by Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois but Roller did not win the heat race and did not place in the first four in the feature race.  Where he did finish does not appear in the published results.

 

Hutchinson News

August 19, 1919 – Page 8

 

 

September 6, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Des Moines County Fairgrounds at Burlington, Iowa

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

There was a $1,500 total purse posted for these races put on by the Tri-State Racing Association of Keokuk, Iowa.  Roller turned in the second fastest time of 1:08.8 in the one-mile time trials, just .6 seconds behind Cliff Woodbury of Chicago, Illinois.  Roller then won the 10-mile race for Fords in a time of 13:09.4.  Next, Roller started in the 30-lap race for cars that were rated under 30 h.p. but dropped out after 9 laps with broken driveshaft housing.  That race was won by Gus Schrader of Newhall, Iowa.

 

September 10 – 11, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Cedar Valley Fairgrounds at Cedar Falls, Iowa

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

            Roller was the overall winner of the two-day contest.

 

October 1, 1920

½ mile dirt ovalCentral Kansas Fairgrounds in Abilene, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller won $50 from the purse for turning in the fastest time of the day in time trials.  He went one mile in 1 minute, 7.5 seconds.

In the Cox Special 5-mile race paying a total of $400 in prize money, Roller led the first four miles before a connecting rod broke in his engine.  The race was won by Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas but Roller had completed more of the race than any of the other competitors so he was awarded the second place prize money.

 

October 8, 1920

½ mile dirt ovalKansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller turned in the fastest time of the day in time trials turning one mile in 1 minute, 6.2 seconds.  For that feat, he received $50 for having the quickest time trial of the day and an additional $100 for breaking the track record for that distance.  He was also given his choice of starting places in each of the races run that day.  He won the 20-lap “Sweepstakes” race for the six fastest qualifiers turning the 10-mile distance in 11 minutes, 56.2 seconds.

 

  The Daily Gate City and Constitution Democrat

August 25, 1920 – Page 8

 

The Daily Gate City and Constitution Democrat

August 31, 1920 – Page 7

 

October 9, 1920

½ mile dirt ovalKansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

           Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4.

Roller won the “Free-for-All” 30-lap “Sweepstakes” in 17 minutes, 47.4 seconds to collect $300 from the day’s posted purse.  His only real competition was Johnnie Mais of Dodge City, Kansas and then Johnny Lee of Wichita, Kansas who pressed Roller after Mais dropped out with a flat tire.  Roller lapped all of the other competitors twice.

 

October 14, 1920

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

            A total purse of $2,000 was posted, $1,000 of which was to be paid to the first three finishers in the 50-mile “Free-for-All”.

Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4

Roller ran 1-lap in time trials of 58.0 second which was the fastest lap run of the ten cars who took time trials.  The fastest lap in time trials was worth $25 from the posted purse.  Race co-promoter Eifrieda Mais ran an exhibition lap in time trials turning in the second fastest lap of the day of 59.0 seconds.

Roller then won the 10-mile race “Free-for-All” over six other competitors in 10:25.0.  First place in that event paid $100.  Johnny Lee finished second in a white Dodge some 33 seconds behind Roller, to collect $60 from the purse.  Third place paid $40 but whoever placed in that position was unnamed in the final race results.

Roller led the 50-lap “Free-for-All” race from the start having figured out how the drive the racetrack without letting off of the throttle in the turns.  He held the lead until 32nd lap when his right rear tire blew out.  It took less than minute to change the tire and he rejoined the race only to have his left rear tire blow out on the 33rd lap.  He changed that tire in less than a minute as well and rejoined the race.  Continuing his flat out style of driving, Roller was able to pass the white Didge driven by Johnny Lee to finish in second place behind Johnnie Mais on the final lap.  Roller received $300 from the purse for his second place finish.

 

November 11, 1920

½ mile dirt ovalMid-America Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas

           Roller drove his 16-valve Roof Ford special #4

Poor weather made for a small crown but Roller turned in the fastest time in time trials.  His time was 1 minute, 6.2 seconds for two laps which was 6.0 seconds quicker than the second fastest time of the day turned in by Leonard Kerbs of Otis, Kansas.

Roller then won the first race which was a five-mile “Free-for-All” event.  His time for that race was 6 minutes, 13.0 seconds.

 

May 24, 1921

½ mile dirt oval – Pavilion Racetrack in Enid, Oklahoma

A Mr. Hatfield from Pawnee, Oklahoma purchased Roller’s 16-valve Roof Ford special #4 and entered it in these same races too so Roller drove a Dodge with an experiential flathead aluminum cylinder head of his own construction.

            The advertised purse for these races was $1,000 but no results of these races have been located to date.

 

June 14, 1921

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Roller drove a Dodge in these races

            Few results of these races have been located to date.  It is known that Roller did not finish well.

 

July 4, 1921

½ mile dirt ovalKansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas

Roller entered a Ford special.

The advertised purse for these races was $700 but Roller’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

September 5, 1921

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

          Roller drove the 16-valve Dodge special #24 owned by Johnnie Mais.

Roller finished second behind Leonard Kerbs in the first 10-mile “Free-for-All” race.

Roller won the 6-car, 10-mile Australian Pursuit in 9:55.0.

Roller won the 6-car, 10-mile “light car” race in 9:41.0.

On the third lap of the 50-mile “Free-for-All”, the steering broke on the front straightaway on the Dodge special being driven by Roy B. Lamb of Dunlap, Kansas.  Roller’s Dodge special bumped into Lamb’s car in the dust causing Roller’s car to catch fire and badly damaging it.  Until the accident, Roller was running in second place behind William K. Adolph who was driving the “J.H.L.” Dodge special owned by Johnny Lee of Wichita, Kansas.

 

October 7, 1921

½ mile dirt ovalCity Park Racetrack in Council Grove, Kansas

Roller drove a Dodge with an experiential flathead aluminum cylinder head of his own construction

Roller turned in the second fastest time of the day in time trials behind Johnnie Mais.  Roller and Mais then finished first and second in each of the rest of the races that were run this day but it is currently unknown which finished which race in which place.  In the final race of the day, a Buick driven by E. C. Miller tangled wheels with Roller’s Dodge leading to Miller’s losing control of his mount.  It sailed through a fence throwing its driver out onto a road outside the racetrack.  Miller received numerous injuries and the crash tore both rear wheels from the Buick.

 

 

Salina Daily Union

October 13, 1920 – Page 6

 

October, 1921 (exact date unknown)

½ mile dirt ovalMid-America Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas

            Roller drove a Dodge with an experiential flathead aluminum cylinder head of his own construction

                        It is unknown how Roller finished in these races but we do know he had trouble getting the cylinder head to work properly.

 

July 4, 1922

1-mile oiled dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Roller drove a Dodge in these races that paid a total purse of $2,000

5,000 spectators watched Roller finish in third place among the fifteen entries in the first 10–mile “Free-for-All” race.  W. K. Adolph of Salina, Kansas won that race followed by W. W. Brown of Kansas City, Missouri who was driving a Duesenberg owned by George L. Mead of Kansas City, Missouri.*

Roller finished second to Johnny Lee of Wichita, Kansas in the second 10-mile race.  Thirteen cars started that event.

Roller finished third in the five-mile race.  That race was won by Johnny Lee who was followed by Albert “Al” Koepka of Topeka, Kansas.

Roller finished second to W. W. Brown in the 50–mile race.

 

September 28, 1922

½ mile dirt ovalCity Park Racetrack in Abilene, Kansas

            Roller drove a Dodge

Roller tried his hand as a race promoter and as the organizer of these races, he posted a total purse of $700 for these races.  More than a dozen cars took part in the races.

Roller set the fastest time in time trials burning two laps in one minute, 7.5 seconds.

Roller finished second to Al Koepke in the five-mile “Free-for-All”.

Roller finished second to John Gerber in the seven-mile handicap race that started six cars.

Roller won the 20-lap feature race in 12 minutes, 34 seconds.

 

October 13, 1922

½ mile dirt ovalPhelps County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Holdrege, Nebraska

          Roller drove a Dodge

A crowd of 3,000 braved a “cold, chilly wind” to watch a field of 25 cars.  Roller turned in the best time in time trials with a lap of 34.0 seconds.  The second fastest time was that of “John B. Gerber of Rock Creek, Kansas”.

 

October 14, 1922

½ mile dirt ovalPhelps County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Holdrege, Nebraska

          Roller drove a Dodge

A crowd of 6,000 watched Roller finish second to Noel Bullock of North Platte, Nebraska.

 

 

  Topeka Daily Capital

October 28, 1922 – Page 13

October 28, 1922

½ mile dirt ovalMid-America Fairgrounds Racetrack in Topeka, Kansas

            Roller drove a Dodge

Seven cars, all from Kansas, were entered in these races.  Roller had the best time for two laps in time trials with 1 minute, 8.2 seconds which was .8 seconds faster that the time turned in by John Gerber of Meriden, Kansas.

Roller won the five mile race for cars with less than 230 cubic inches of engine displacement.  His time for that was 6 minutes, 10.4 seconds and his prize was $50.

Roller also won the ten-mile “Free-for-All” race in 11 minutes, 54.4 seconds to collect another $100 from the purse.

Roller and Albert “Al” Koepke, also in a Dodge, swapped the lead several times during the first ten miles of the 25-mile championship race but Roller dropped out before the event had reached the half-way point.  Late in the race, Koepke was passed by Glenn Royer of

Council Grove, Kansas who was driving a Buick.  Royer held on for the victory and received $300 for his effort while Koepke came in second.  Note:  Al Koepke’s wife was a sister to Harold’s wife, Ethel Roller.

  

Harold Roller sat out the 1923 racing season suffering from an undisclosed but critical medical condition for which he was treated at a hospital in Kansas City.  He was accompanied on the trip by his brother who was a doctor.

 

August 14, 1924

1-mile dirt ovalFranklin County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Franklin, Nebraska

Roller finished second to Walter Higley of Coffeyville, Kansas in the first heat race.  Higley went on the win the feature race this day but there is no further mention of Roller in the published race results.

 

August 24, 1924

½ mile dirt ovalPhelps County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Holdrege, Nebraska

“A large crowd” saw Roller finish second to Bob Maze of Topeka, Kansas in the fourth heat race.  Noel Bullock of North Platte, Nebraska won the “Grand Sweepstakes” race.  Note:  Roller’s brother-in-law, Albert “Al” Koepke, was seriously injured when his car locked wheels with another and then overturned in one of these races.

 

August 25. 1924

½ mile dirt ovalBuffalo County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Kearney, Nebraska

Roller finished third in the 10-lap feature race behind Walter Higley and Guy Deulen of Bridgeport, Nebraska.

 

October 18, 1924

½ mile dirt ovalCity Park Racetrack in Council Grove, Kansas

Roller finished second behind a Chevrolet driven by John Gerber of Meriden, Kansas in each of the four races they competed in.

 

November 6, 1924 

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Belleville, Kansas

Roller won the “Class A” 5-mile “Professional” race in a time of 5 minutes, 45 seconds.  He then finished second to Lou Reynolds of St. Joseph, Missouri in the “Professional” 20-lap final.

 

 

 

Belleville Telescope

September 10, 1925 – Page 3

 

 

May 30, 1925

½ mile dirt oval – Marion Fairgrounds Racetrack at Marion, Iowa

Roller drove his Ford to a second place finish in the third 10-lap heat race behind Bert Ficken of Omaha, Nebraska who was driving a Dodge.  Much of this program, including the feature race, was canceled due to rain.

 

August 5, 1925

½ mile dirt ovalMeade County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Sturgis, South Dakota

Roller won a consolation race for non-money winners at the annual “Black Hills Auto Classic.”

 

1925 (exact date unknown)

½ mile dirt ovalRed Willow County Fairgrounds Racetrack at McCook, Nebraska

            Roller drove a Fronty Ford

Roller turned in the third quickest time in time trials of 34.75 seconds behind Guy Deulen and Walter Higley.  He then finished third in the first heat race behind Higley and Deulen.  Roller rounded out the day by finishing second to Higley in the 20-lap feature race.

 

September 16 – 17, 1925

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

There was a $1,550 purse posted for these races but no results of these races have been located to date.

  

            Sports writers had referred to Harold as "Doc" Roller ever since his beginning in the sport.  He was given the moniker because of a well-known professional wrestler of that time who was also known as "Doc Roller".

            Harold Roller retired from racing in the late 1920s and moved to Tampa, Florida where he founded the Roller Spring & Brake Company.  He passed away on October 5, 1964 and is buried in Myrtle Hill Memorial Park Cemetery in Tampa.  Ethel Roller moved to Tennessee where she passed away in 1976.  She is buried beside him.

 

 

 

 

 

Findagrave.com

 

 

 

 

* The owner of the Duesenberg driven by W. W. Brown was almost certainly George L. Wade of Kansas City, Missouri rather than George L. Mead as was stated in the published results of these races.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you

Bob Mays and James Taggart